EU Referendum

Collection by Albert Tapper

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Stuff of interest about this important event in British politics.

Albert Tapper
Leave was always a good bet because the bookies .decided to take their own view, trying to be political scientists rather than listening to their customers

Albert Tapper.

In recent days, several people have asked for my view on the EU Referendum result. I have spent three years on a PhD looking at EU support in Britain and a lifetime in political betting, on and off as a political odds-maker. I've also taken some serious hits. The worst was a £16k loss on the 1997 General Election opposing the Lib Dems. As a spread bet, for every seat they won over 30, I lost £1,000. They got 46, including winning Winchester by one vote. The first one vote winning margin…

Why was Remain a 90+ percent chance with bookmakers on the day of the vote?  A conspiracy is market rigging by city traders to influence foreign exchange rates;

Libor Mk2? Were the betting markets on the EU Referendum fixed by The City to manipulate FX markets?

Wild political and economic times breed paranoia and conspiracy theory. Right now, people are saying the Sunday Times is sniffing around about a big story. A gigantic story. Elements in the City attempted to rig the relatively illiquid betting markets on the day of the EU Referendum. They wanted to send Foreign Exchange markets the wrong way – i.e. strengthen the Pound – so they could sell it at high levels and make a killing when it collapsed with a Brexit vote. Their losing outlay on…

Europhiles think history is on their side – they could be in for a shock

By dismissing Outers as out-of-date traditionalists, the EU’s cheerleaders have made a big mistake which may cost them the referendum

Why academics have got it wrong about British public support for the EU.

Academic unanimity in favour of EU membership is to be expected, but derogatory views about public attitudes are less acceptable

Nigel Farage has called a campaign for the impartiality of British academia in the forthcoming EU Membership referendum. His argument is that academics are so widely and heavily funded by the EU they cannot be properly free-thinking. On this he is surely right. In July, Universities for Europe and Universities UK (which represent 133 higher education institutions) came out with unequivocal backing for the campaign for Britain to remain in the EU. How can this be reconciled with the idea that…