Japanese photographer Shinichi Maruyama has an interesting series of photos simply titled, “Nude.” Each image shows an abstract flesh-colored shape that’s created by a nude subject dancing in front of the camera.    Although the photographs look like long-exposure shots, they’re actually composite images created by combining ten thousand individual photographs of each dancer. The result is a look in which each model’s body is (mostly) lost within the blur of its movement.

Japanese photographer Shinichi Maruyama has an interesting series of photos simply titled, “Nude.” Each image shows an abstract flesh-colored shape that’s created by a nude subject dancing in front of the camera. Although the photographs look like long-exposure shots, they’re actually composite images created by combining ten thousand individual photographs of each dancer. The result is a look in which each model’s body is (mostly) lost within the blur of its movement.

Microbe Portraits Capture The Gorgeous Interaction Of Photography And Bacteria  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/25/seung-hwan-oh_n_5877124.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular

Microbe Portraits Capture The Gorgeous Interaction Of Photography And Bacteria http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/25/seung-hwan-oh_n_5877124.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular

Hello, I’m Kieron Cropper. I make collage art under the pseudonyum and I live in Brighton. I create artwork using vintage imagery and overlooked fragments of old books and magazines. I then combine these using a series of analogue and digital techniques.

New intriguing collections designed by Vibia at designjunction 2013 #design #light #minimal @VIBIA

New intriguing collections designed by Vibia at designjunction 2013 #design #light #minimal @VIBIA

Lighting installment designed to encourage taking the stairs.

Lighting installment designed to encourage taking the stairs.

Living in boxes II by Kent Mathiesen, via 500px - I don't know why, but I find this image of a Copenhagen building endlessly fascinating. Perhaps it is the juxtaposition of the skewed and distorted windows against the precise, perfect rectilinearity of the more conservative windows. It is almost as if they were having a debate on the merits of experimentation and doing your own thing, regardless of what anybody thinks.

Living in boxes II by Kent Mathiesen, via 500px - I don't know why, but I find this image of a Copenhagen building endlessly fascinating. Perhaps it is the juxtaposition of the skewed and distorted windows against the precise, perfect rectilinearity of the more conservative windows. It is almost as if they were having a debate on the merits of experimentation and doing your own thing, regardless of what anybody thinks.

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