OkeeChobee

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the sun is setting behind a fence and palm tree in the foreground, on a foggy day
Sunrise at the Cow Pasture Kenansville Florida
a group of people standing in front of a building with a giant alligator's mouth
11 Best Places To See Alligators In Florida
Vintage Postcard Gatorland Entrance
a man riding on the back of a horse over an obstacle
Believe it or not, the filly in this photo was a racehorse in her first career. Her name was Clarrie and she had a bad habit of bucking off jockeys and exercise riders. Clarrie became a rodeo horse and apparently loved her job. She even set a height record for horses coming out of the shoot.
two men riding horses in front of a small hut with thatched roof and trees
Cow Camp Living History - Central Florida's Cowboy Days
an old black and white photo of a street with palm trees in front of buildings
The Clarendon: 1905 high-resolution photo
Shorpy Historical Photo Archive :: Daytona Beach circa 1905. "The Clarendon Hotel -- Seabreeze, Florida." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company.
an old black and white photo of people walking down the street in front of buildings
miami beach, 1908 photo
Miami beach, 1908
three women in swimsuits standing next to a sign
Floridiana Articles
BLOG: Florida was one of the first states to create highway welcome centers, which have now become almost standard across the nation. The establishment of the Dixie Highway routed travelers as far north as Michigan into the state of Florida via a little town called Yulee. Leaders of the growing Florida tourism industry saw this as an excellent opportunity to educate out-of-towners on the many sites and attractions the state had to offer. | Florida Memory
an advertisement for florida vacation never ends with people sitting on the grass and drinking wine
Soft Water
1949 Florida ad... watch out for alligators?
an old black and white photo of cars parked on the street
Business district on 12th Street - St. Cloud, Florida.
Business district on 12th Street - St. Cloud, Florida
an old black and white photo shows the damage of a bridge that has been knocked over
1928 - Okeechobee, FL
an old black and white photo of people posing for a group shot with hats on
History of flushing Lake Okeechobee dates back to 1800s
History of flushing Lake Okeechobee dates back to 1800s
1928 Hurricane Lake Okeechobee, Florida. In 1928, before hurricanes were officially named, a storm known as San Felipe II, the Storm of '28, and the Lake Okeechobee Hurricane killed over 5,000 people in Puerto Rico and Florida. The climactic news filled our nation's headlines. It remains the second deadliest tropical storm in U.S. history. People, Atlantic Hurricane, South Bay, Florida Hurricane, Storm Surge
Photo of 1928 hurricane in action.
1928 Hurricane Lake Okeechobee, Florida. In 1928, before hurricanes were officially named, a storm known as San Felipe II, the Storm of '28, and the Lake Okeechobee Hurricane killed over 5,000 people in Puerto Rico and Florida. The climactic news filled our nation's headlines. It remains the second deadliest tropical storm in U.S. history.
two men are standing in front of an old car that has been destroyed into pieces
Margaret Orr: How El Niño affects the Atlantic hurricane season
. Okeechobee Hurricane (1928) -- In South Florida, at least 2,500 were killed when a storm surge from Lake Okeechobee breached the dike surr...
an old black and white photo of people standing in front of a house
NYPL Digital Collections
Children playing outside of nursery at Okeechobee migratory labor camps built by Farm Security Administration, Belle Glade, Florida, February 1941.
an old black and white photo of people walking in the rain on a city street
The Deadliest Hurricanes in U.S. History - Photo Essays
San Felipe a.k.a. Okeechobee Hurricane, Florida, 1928 2,500 dead This storm was only the second hurricane to reach Category 5 strength in the Atlantic Basin at the time of its landfall. Residents of the hard-hit Lake Okeechobee region had returned to their homes after hearing rumors that the storm had passed, but soon a surge of water covered hundreds of square miles around the lake; in some places it would reach up to 20 ft. (6 m) deep.