Sam Eccels

Sam Eccels

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Sam Eccels
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Thorny Devil Lizard

Thorny dragon (Moloch horridus) The thorny dragon or thorny devil is an Australian lizard. The thorny devil grows up to 20 cm in) in length, and it can live for up to 20 years.

Scientists have discovered 24 new species of wildlife in the South American highlands of Suriname, including a frog with fluorescent purple markings. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-459834/The-incredible-purple-frog-thats-24-new-species-discovered-South-America.html#ixzz1UK2LB9fV

atelopus frog is known by many names such as the clown frog or the Costa Rican Variable Harlequin Toad. Whatever you call the frog, it is a neo-tropical toad that was once quite wide spread living throughout Costa Rica and Panama

Newly discovered species of leopard with largest fangs in cat world. Long thought to be identical to the clouded leopards living on mainland South East Asia, genetic analysis has shown that the Bornean big cat is in fact a separate species.

Newly discovered species of leopard with largest fangs in cat world. Long thought to be identical to the clouded leopards living on mainland South East Asia, genetic analysis has shown that the Bornean big cat is in fact a separate species. So beautiful!

22 Strange Animals You Probably Didn’t Know Exist | Bored Panda

Also named the Sunda Flying Lemur or the Malayan Flying Lemur. The Sunda Flying Lemur, also known as the Malayan Flying Lemur, is a species of colugo, not lemur. Until recently, it was thought to b.

Real - This bulbous red fish with spiky scales and foot-like fins is a species of Sea Toad (Chaunacops coloratus), deep sea anglerfish, that has never been seen alive - until now! Researchers are thrilled to have spotted this rare deep-sea fish in its natural habitat. In addition to documenting it "walking" along the ocean floor and fishing with their built-in lures they've documented that it actually changes color from blue to red as it ages.

A blue-red Chaunacops coloratus anglerfish filmed by MBARI. These were first described in 1899 from a dead specimen, and hadn't been seen alive before! It is possible these fish change colour as they age. From BBC nature.