Em O'regan
More ideas from Em
Mrs. Chippy was a tomcat belonging to the Endurance’s carpenter, Henry McNeish. He was called Mrs. Chippy because he followed McNeish around like an over-possessive wife   During the voyage, the Endurance became trapped in ice. Realizing that they would die if they didn’t take their fate into their own hands, Shackleton decided they should set out for the nearest land mass on lifeboat

Mrs. Chippy was a tomcat belonging to the Endurance’s carpenter, Henry McNeish. He was called Mrs. Chippy because he followed McNeish around like an over-possessive wife During the voyage, the Endurance became trapped in ice. Realizing that they would die if they didn’t take their fate into their own hands, Shackleton decided they should set out for the nearest land mass on lifeboat

Inside Shakleton's Cape Royds Hut, Ross Island, Antarctica.  Photo:  Helen Ahern

Inside Shakleton's Cape Royds Hut, Ross Island, Antarctica. Photo: Helen Ahern

Frank Hurley's camera on the Shackleton polar expedition he was official photographer

Frank Hurley's camera on the Shackleton polar expedition he was official photographer

A saturday evening toast to 'Sweethearts and Wives' on board the 'Endurance', during the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1914-17, led by Ernest Shackleton.

A saturday evening toast to 'Sweethearts and Wives' on board the 'Endurance', during the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1914-17, led by Ernest Shackleton.

The greatest story ever told: Today in polar history: Oct 29, 1908, Ernest Shackleton's polar party begin their trek, includes Adams, Marshall and Wild.

The greatest story ever told: Today in polar history: Oct 29, 1908, Ernest Shackleton's polar party begin their trek, includes Adams, Marshall and Wild.

**Frank Hurley 1915

**Frank Hurley 1915

Antarctica - Frank Hurlet

Antarctica - Frank Hurlet

Antarctic explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton set off on his final expedition in search of the ‘lost’ Antarctic islands in 1921. However, he fell ill on the journey and, upon the boat’s arrival in Georgia in January 1922, he suffered a fatal heart attack. Rather than returning the body to England he was buried, at his wife’s request, in the Grytviken cemetery, South Georgia.

Antarctic explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton set off on his final expedition in search of the ‘lost’ Antarctic islands in 1921. However, he fell ill on the journey and, upon the boat’s arrival in Georgia in January 1922, he suffered a fatal heart attack. Rather than returning the body to England he was buried, at his wife’s request, in the Grytviken cemetery, South Georgia.

Rafting astern brash ice made by the 'Endurance' in efforts to break free, during the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1914-17, led by Ernest Shackleton.

Rafting astern brash ice made by the 'Endurance' in efforts to break free, during the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1914-17, led by Ernest Shackleton.

Ice mask on C.T. Madigan, one of Sir Douglas Mawson's team pictured some time between 1911-1914 by Frank Hurley.

Ice mask on C.T. Madigan, one of Sir Douglas Mawson's team pictured some time between 1911-1914 by Frank Hurley.