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Van Gogh had such an incredible touch to his work. He painted how he saw the world through his eyes which is simply beautiful. Considering he was constantly misunderstood in his years. Called mad. Hell, if he was mad, I want to be mad.

Vincent van Gogh Paintings from Arles

Van Gogh had such an incredible touch to his work. He painted how he saw the world through his eyes which is simply beautiful. Considering he was constantly misunderstood in his years. Called mad. Hell, if he was mad, I want to be mad.

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People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo--and the Evil That Swallowed by Richard Lloyd Parry, http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007RMYAPA/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_LGpQqb0ZAMYNB

People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo--and the Evil That Swallowed by Richard Lloyd Parry, http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007RMYAPA/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_LGpQqb0ZAMYNB

NILOFER SULEMAN CHANDNI CHOWK ANTIQUE STORE ACRYLIC ON CANVAS 60 x 45 2014 On Request

NILOFER SULEMAN CHANDNI CHOWK ANTIQUE STORE ACRYLIC ON CANVAS 60 x 45 2014 On Request

NILOFER SULEMAN Hotel Navras ACRYLIC ON CANVAS 28 X 21 2014 ON REQUEST

NILOFER SULEMAN Hotel Navras ACRYLIC ON CANVAS 28 X 21 2014 ON REQUEST


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Hari-hara, the union of Vishnu and Shiva/ Physical description - Hari-hara or Shankaranarayana, the union of Vishnu(Hari) and Shiva(Hara). From a series of 100 drawings of Hindu deities created in South India./ Place of Origin - Trichinopoly, India/ Date - ca. 1825/  Artist/maker - Unknown/  Materials and Techniques - Gouache on watermarked paper/  Dimensions - Length: 22 cm, Width: 18 cm

Hari-hara, the union of Vishnu and Shiva (Painting)

Hari-hara, the union of Vishnu and Shiva/ Physical description - Hari-hara or Shankaranarayana, the union of Vishnu(Hari) and Shiva(Hara). From a series of 100 drawings of Hindu deities created in South India./ Place of Origin - Trichinopoly, India/ Date - ca. 1825/ Artist/maker - Unknown/ Materials and Techniques - Gouache on watermarked paper/ Dimensions - Length: 22 cm, Width: 18 cm

Qian Weicheng: Camellas Print - The Met Store

Qian Weicheng: Camellas Print

Qian Weicheng: Camellas Print - The Met Store

boy-behind-jack-tree.jpg - Painting,  48x48 cm ©2013 by Murali Nagapuzha -  Painting, Oil

boy-behind-jack-tree.jpg - Painting, 48x48 cm ©2013 by Murali Nagapuzha - Painting, Oil

Kalamkari Temple Hangings 	  by Anna L. Dallapiccola and Rosemary Crill.  A presentation of V & A Museum's collection of Kalamkari paintings. The above image is from p.74 (probably of Devi.)

Kalamkari Temple Hangings by Anna L. Dallapiccola and Rosemary Crill. A presentation of V & A Museum's collection of Kalamkari paintings. The above image is from p.74 (probably of Devi.)

wall:art love - ispaceart

wall:art love - ispaceart

Flowers sketchbook by Katerina Pytina on Behance. Watercolor wildrose

Flowers sketchbook by Katerina Pytina on Behance. Watercolor wildrose

A Pichhavai of the Vraj Parikrama Jatra, depicting Krishna as Shrinathji. India, Rajasthan, Nathdwara, 19th Century. This unusual pichhavai is in actuality a topographical depiction of Vrindavan and its surrounding villages on the banks of the Yamuna River. The Jatra is a pilgrimage route that is undertaken in a clockwise manner, passing through 12 vanas (forests), 24 upvanas (groves), and Mount Govardhana in a practice that is still observed by pilgrims today.  via www.columbia.edu

A Pichhavai of the Vraj Parikrama Jatra, depicting Krishna as Shrinathji. India, Rajasthan, Nathdwara, 19th Century. This unusual pichhavai is in actuality a topographical depiction of Vrindavan and its surrounding villages on the banks of the Yamuna River. The Jatra is a pilgrimage route that is undertaken in a clockwise manner, passing through 12 vanas (forests), 24 upvanas (groves), and Mount Govardhana in a practice that is still observed by pilgrims today. via www.columbia.edu