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Air Plants

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for Air Plants. Get inspired and try out new things.

Air Plant Care: How to Tend, Fertilize, and Water Tillandsia

Air plants are fun to grow, but they do have specific needs when it comes to their care. These air plant care tips share everything you need to know.

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Air Plant Care: 6 Easy Tricks to Keep Tillandsia Alive - Sunset Magazine

Air plants are easy to care for indoors. These simple tips will keep your Tillandsia thriving with the right balance of air, water, food, and light.

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Easy Air Plant Care Guide with Infographics

Looking for an Easy Air Plant Care Guide? We cover everything from watering tillandsia, to feeding, and lots more tips too. With a printable + pinnable infographic!

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29 Best air purifying plants from NASA clean air study

Below is the list of 29 best air purifying plants from NASA clean air study, test results of the study led by NASA researcher Dr. B. C. Wolverton have proven most authentic and widely accepted all over the world.

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What's Wrong With My Air Plant Series: Air Plant Rot or Falling Apart

Just a few days ago your air plant seemed fine. You watered it just like you normally do, and now a few days later, it’s completely falling apart! What is happening? Sorry to say, but your little air plant may be the victim of wet rot. Maybe you left your plants in their bath a little too long, or you forgot to shake out the excess water from the leaves before putting it back in its place. Whatever it was, somehow water sat amongst the leaves and base of your plant which caused it to rot. Your air plant can also suffer from what is referred to as dry rot, which is caused when there is lack of airflow and the plant suffers. Most of the time rot is caused by over watering and staying wet/damp for prolonged periods of time allowing fungus and bad bacteria to take hold and damage the plant. Identifying Rot If the base of your air plant looks brown and feels overly soft/mushy to the touch, it might be the victim of rot or fungus. Often times a rotting air plant will also lose leaves around its base and could start to fall apart, or the center of the air plant might come out. Inner rot is tough to diagnose as you generally are not aware until the plant just falls apart one day, normally from the inside leaves first. Signs of inner rot/fungus on a Tillandsia (air plant) The start of leaf rot on a tillandsia ionantha **Note that some air plants like the melanocrater tricolor will have naturally darker bases. Also some leaf shedding can be normal in healthy air plants.** Leaf rot and fungal issues can also been seen on the outer leaves, which is much more noticeable than inner rot. You may notice this as dark spots on the base of the plant, which will continue to spread over time. In this scenario, in an attempt to save the plant it's best to try to remove the affected leaves from the base of the plant to stop the spread of the fungus/rot. In the pictures below, we show a T. stricta that is showing some signs of leaf damage and possible fungal issue. While it's normal for some leaves at the base of an air plant (Tillandsia) to become dry or brown and die off, there is a dark circular area of the leaf that doesn't look normal. In this case, we gently removed some of the leaves at the base of the plant to help prevent any spread of possible fungus. The photo on the right shows the plant after cleaning up with the affected leaves removed. It's ok if the very tip of the base has some browning or looks callused over, as this is the bottom of the stem where roots will grow form. How to avoid rot There are some simple ways to avoid rot: Stick to a watering schedule and make sure not to over water. Remember that Tillandsia are different from many common house plants in that they take in moisture through their leaves and trichomes, not their roots, and can be susceptible to over-watering. Never leave an air plant submerged in water for long periods of time. Tailor your care and watering schedule to the type of Tillandsia (air plant) you have. Silver leafed varieties are considered Xeric, and will need different levels of water (and even different watering methods) than Mesic green-leafed varieties. To learn more about the different types of air plants, check out this article about Xeric and Mesic air plants. For general care info check out our article all about Air Plant Care. After watering, make sure to shake out any excess water from your air plant, and let the plant dry completely before adding it back to your terrarium, shell, or wherever you have your plant displayed. Do not spray air plants in their terrariums or allow them to sit against moisture. Pay particularly close attention to bulbous air plants as well as air plants which have deep pockets in their leaf base, as these can be more prone to holding water in their base. Air flow is important! Don’t display your air plant in a closed off terrarium or container. If your terrarium has a lid, leave it off. Air plants need proper air circulation to thrive, and without this, rot can occur. Remove any exterior leaves at the base if they are showing signs of fungus or rot starting. If the plant has inner rot, trying to remove the inner leaves will not work and will likely be damaging to the plant. My Air Plant Is Rotting. Can it be saved? Unfortunately, rot tends to be one of the things that, once it starts, is hard to reverse and save the plant from. The best remedy for rot is prevention! Having said that, cinnamon has been known to help reduce or stop rot/fungus on the base of plants as its a natural fungicide and may be worth a try! If only a few outer leaves are affected, we also recommend removing those leaves as previously depicted. As always, email us at info@airplantdesignstudio.com with any care questions that you may have about your air plants. We are happy to help!

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Air Plant Holder - Wall Mount for Air Plants, Wood Air Plant Stand, Air Plant Mount

Wooden wall mounts for air plants are a stylish and more natural looking way to display your air plants. These handmade air plant holders are thin sliced slabs of real wood with plant safe aluminum wire bands in the middle, slightly adjustable, to securely hold your plants in place. These plant holders measure around 3.5 to 4 in diameter and are suitable for most plants in the 2 to 5 inch range. Some larger plants may be ok but it depends on the plant! Feel free to ask me if you're unsure when choosing a plant for your mount. Each order is for one piece, not a set. To add more than one mount to your cart, just use the drop down menu when ordering to select the quantity you would like. Each piece comes with one command strip to stick on the back to stick on the wall but you may certainly use your own DIY hanging method if you choose. Please use the command strips at your own risk, I am not responsible for any damage caused to a wall due to improper use. ;) Plants not included in sale price. From time to time, I will also have some slightly flawed pieces available at a reduced price, you can find these in the drop down menu when ordering. These will have either a natural crack in the wood or a small piece of bark missing from the outer ring. Great for anyone who isn't too picky about perfection! These pieces will come with a command strip. I always provide beautiful, healthy, quality Tillandsia and Bromeliad and related accessories, a true difference you can see! Thanks for looking and be sure to check out my other listings for more great finds! Hit that follow button and check back often!

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Air Plant Care: How to Tend, Fertilize, and Water Tillandsia

Air plants are fun to grow, but they do have specific needs when it comes to their care. These air plant care tips share everything you need to know.

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Simplesmente Fascinante

fonte: Pinterest.com Acho que vale a pena reaproveitar a casca do côco, nem tudo fica bonito, mas usá-lo como vasinho ou cachepô fica uma graça.

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Air Plants That You Should Avoid Soaking

While most air plants do well with 15-30 minute soaks once a week, there are some air plants that actually would prefer to be misted or dunked rather than soaked. Whether you should soak or dunk your plants is something that you will want to keep in mind when caring for your plants, and will help your air plants live long healthy lives. ************************************************************************************************* A good rule to follow is most air plants that have an abundance of trichomes (xeric plants) should often be dunked or misted, while plants with bright green leaves and less trichomes ( mesic plants) prefer to be soaked once a week. You can learn more about the difference between Xeric and Mesic plants in our blog post Mesic Vs Xeric Air Plants. There is an exception to this rule though, air plants with bulbous bases, even those with bright green smooth leaves, often should not be soaked for long periods of time either. Water can get trapped in their bulbous bases and could cause the plants to rot from the inside out. Xerographica Xerographica air plants should be dunked or sprayed rather than soaked. These plants are considered xeric, and come from dry regions. These plants can withstand less water and more sun. We recommend dunking a xerographica in a bowl or bucket of water and then shaking it gently to allow the water to fall from its leaves. Let dry upside down to ensure water doesn't get trapped in its leaves. Tectorum Ecuador Characterized by abundantly fuzzy leaves, the Tillandsia tectorum is an air plant that you will not want to soak. The ample trichomes that the tectorum has on its leaves help it absorb moisture from the air. These plants are naturally found in arid regions of Ecuador and Peru, and have adapted to live without much moisture. We recommend misting these guys every other week or so depending on how hot and dry your climate is. These also prefer bright light and good air flow. Bulbous Air Plants Bulbous air plants are unique in that they have what are called

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