Victorian London

A Crinoline shop. A crinoline is a stiffened petticoat or skirt-shaped structure designed to support the skirts of a woman's dress

1910.  Children in London

1910 - London dockers children, living in rat infested slums, surviving on discarded fish heads and tails from Billingsgate Fish Market. Their Fathers went on strike for a minimum wage of per hour per week)

1910.  Children in London

1910 - London dockers children, living in rat infested slums, surviving on discarded fish heads and tails from Billingsgate Fish Market. Their Fathers went on strike for a minimum wage of per hour per week)

Up until the 20th century, London was filled with squalid slums known as Rookeries. The most famous was in St Giles, though other Rookeries include Rosemary Lane and Jacob's Island in Bermondsey, where Dickens's Oliver Twist villain Bill Sykes meets his end.

Richard Guard's 'Lost London'

Up until the century, London was filled with squalid slums known as Rookeries. The most famous was in St Giles, though other Rookeries include Rosemary Lane and Jacob's Island in Bermondsey, where Dickens's Oliver Twist villain Bill Sykes meets his end.

Drury Court, London, viewed from Drury Lane and showing its junction with Wych Street. On the left corner is Symonds, whose trade isn't clear, but the higher sign offers tea and coffee rooms. Partway down a quieter Drury Court than seen above right, sunshine slashes across the street. Almost beside it a street light stands in the middle of the road. A painting by another artist explains it more clearly: the rest of the Court is pedestrian only - the lamp marks where carts have to bear right

Drury Court, London, viewed from Drury Lane and showing its junction with Wych Street. On the left corner is Symonds, whose trade isn't clear, but the higher sign offers tea and coffee rooms.

An Elizabethan house on Grub Street, London

Ancient timbered house on Grub St,London, illustrator not known to me

Temple Bar & Fleet Street, 1870. London.

VINTAGE LONDON: Temple Bar, Fleet Street, It was moved to a wood near Cheshunt, Hertfordshire - overgrown with weeds and unloved - until it was moved to Paternoster Square, next to St Paul's Cathedral in

The industrial landscape on the Regent's Canal, London, c1905. The Regent's Canal, connecting the Paddington Canal and the Thames at Limehouse, was opened in 1820. The canal cost £772,000 to construct, twice the amount originally estimated. In 1929 the Regent's Canal Company purchased the Grand Junction and Warwick Canals, merging the three waterways to create the Grand Union Canal.

The Lock-keeper Caption: "Looking roughly east at City Road locks on the Regents Canal

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