Horace Warner’s intimate portraits of London’s poorest children in the early 1900s

Spitalfields Nippers: Annie, seven, and one-year-old Nellie, sit sad and hungry on sacking outside their house in Spitalfields. They were among ten children born to single mother Annie Daniels. Five of their siblings died in childhood

Matchgirls participating in a strike against Bryant & May in London, 1888. The strike was caused by the poor working conditions in the match factory, including fourteen-hour work days and the severe health complications of working with white phosphorus.

Shared comment: Victorian match girls 1888 worked in terrible conditions, 14 hours a day for very little wages. Phosphorous used in making matches caused hair and teeth loss, yellowing of skin and phossy jaw, a type of facial bone cancer.

Whitechapel ~ 1888

- the year of the Jack the Ripper murders and a group of children huddle by the wall in a Whitechapel slum.

The Tabard Inn, Borough High Street, London. First established in 1307 and destroyed by fire in the 17th Century.

The Tabard Inn, Borough High Street, London. "First established in 1307 and destroyed by fire in the Century." This can't be the original Inn, as they did not have photography in the c. Maybe they rebuilt it?

Mr Gorton's chemist, 146 Whitechapel Rd, London, 1900

Mr Gorton's chemist, 146 Whitechapel Rd, London, My great grandfather's shop.

Queen Mary was known for her ability to keep her feelings to herself, however, by 1952, she had already lost her son Prince John, her husband King George V, another son--Prince George, the Duke of Kent, and then, finally, "Bertie"--King George VI. By this point, she was also dying from cancer. This photo shows a rare glimpse into the enormous grief she must have been feeling.

Queen Mary was known for her ability to keep her feelings to herself, however…

Real life Oliver Twists: Child workers were often beaten, abused, hungry and tired. Their childhood was often over before it begun

Britain's child slaves: They started at 4am, lived off acorns and had nails put through their ears for shoddy work. Yet, says a new book, their misery helped forge Britain

A bunch of smiling workers of a bustling, industrious nation. A tiny federal government, no EPA, no FDA, and no unions allowed people to work as hard as they wanted. Truly a free market paradise.

Street life in late Victorian London

Wall-workers (a system of cheap advertising whereby a wall is covered with an array of placards that are hung up in the morning and taken in at night). Photo by John Thomson for the magazine Street Life in London, 1876

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