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Asymmetric and embellished sleeve from Quadrivium (the Latin name given to a collection of four liberal arts that includes number, geometry, music and cosmology), Sang Yoon's collection 2014.

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"Maieutica," cut wool and silk felt, by Yukako Sorai, on view at the Sculpture Center, Cleveland.

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"Vortex of Thinking," wool, by Mizuki Machida, on view at the Sculpture Center, Cleveland.

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An indigo dyed cotton pair of momohiki, a traditional, tight-fitting legging that was worn by almost everybody in old Japan — men and women alike. This type of legging was worn well into the mid 20th century in rural areas. Credit: Stephen Szczepanek of Sri Threads

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Boro: This is a patched work coat, or noragi, that likely never began as a full garment, but was rather made from multiple, very small patches — some of them the size of a postage stamp — that were all sewn together to create an area of cloth, and then layered. Credit: Stephen Szczepanek of Sri Threads

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Kay Sekimachi‘s “Kunoyuki.” Bay Area artist Kay Sekimachi. Using nylon filament woven into flat bands, Sekimachi constructs forms that combine spilling and falling with symmetry and structure. Her material looks as fragile and evanescent as cobwebs or clouds. In fact, it’s the same slender but tough material from which many heavy works in the show are suspended.

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17th century handwoven silk-velvet textile with floral motif, Italy (likely provenance Genoa or Venice). Image courtesy of SF-based textile dealer Kathleen Taylor, Lotus Collection.

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Boro: A sodenashi, which literally means "a sleeveless garment" once common in old Japan and used for various types of outdoor work. The sleeves and collar were removable, making it versatile for both summer and winter wear. Credit: Stephen Szczepanek of Sri Threads