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Josef Breitenbach remembers being welcomed cordially, but with an apology from John Steinbeck that he must finish doing his laundry before the session might begin. Breitenbach, newly arrived in the U.S., had never before seen a washing machine, so Steinbeck invited him to the laundry room to see how such a thing worked. Steinbeck was followed everywhere by a pet that Breitenbach found appropriate to the writer’s simple and friendly presence: a large, scruffy sheepdog.

Josef Breitenbach remembers being welcomed cordially, but with an apology from John Steinbeck that he must finish doing his laundry before the session might begin. Breitenbach, newly arrived in the U.S., had never before seen a washing machine, so Steinbeck invited him to the laundry room to see how such a thing worked. Steinbeck was followed everywhere by a pet that Breitenbach found appropriate to the writer’s simple and friendly presence: a large, scruffy sheepdog.

Francine du Plessix Gray: “One learns much more by writing fiction, because the insights come from those deeper subconscious levels where the greater and more interesting truths lie.”

Francine du Plessix Gray, The Art of Fiction No. 96

Francine du Plessix Gray: “One learns much more by writing fiction, because the insights come from those deeper subconscious levels where the greater and more interesting truths lie.”

Dorthe Nors: “Literature should express that human condition—we’re all gonna get slapped around.”

Getting Slapped Around: An Interview with Dorthe Nors

Dorthe Nors: “Literature should express that human condition—we’re all gonna get slapped around.”

Mary Szybist: “I have always been attracted to apostrophe, perhaps because of its resemblance to prayer. A voice reaches out to something beyond itself that cannot answer it.”

A World Beyond the Glass: An Interview with Mary Szybist

Mary Szybist: “I have always been attracted to apostrophe, perhaps because of its resemblance to prayer. A voice reaches out to something beyond itself that cannot answer it.”

A. R. Ammons: “Running a business is like writing a poem. In business, for example, you bring in the raw materials and then subject them to a certain kind of human change. You introduce the raw materials into a system of order, like the making of a poem, and once the matter is shaped it’s ready to be shipped.”

Business as Poetry

A. R. Ammons: “Running a business is like writing a poem. In business, for example, you bring in the raw materials and then subject them to a certain kind of human change. You introduce the raw materials into a system of order, like the making of a poem, and once the matter is shaped it’s ready to be shipped.”

Delmore Schwartz circa 1958. W. H. Auden said of this photograph, “Nobody should look that unhappy.”

Delmore Schwartz circa 1958. W. H. Auden said of this photograph, “Nobody should look that unhappy.”

Elizabeth Spencer: “Writing is hard work and guarantees no security, no rewards or pensions—it can’t promise you anything. Bearing that in mind, you go ahead with it because you love it. Any art has the aspects of a love affair, lifelong.”

Elizabeth Spencer, The Art of Fiction No. 110

Elizabeth Spencer: “Writing is hard work and guarantees no security, no rewards or pensions—it can’t promise you anything. Bearing that in mind, you go ahead with it because you love it. Any art has the aspects of a love affair, lifelong.”

Multilingual Wordsmiths, Part 2: Michael Hofmann in an Age of Increasing Insufficiency - Los Angeles Review of Books

Multilingual Wordsmiths, Part 2: Michael Hofmann in an Age of Increasing Insufficiency - Los Angeles Review of Books

Dodie Bellamy: “Self-criticism comes in during gaps where I lose my focus, or sometimes when I’m up in front of a room giving a reading and I’m unexpectedly mortified, and there’s nothing else to do but to continue reading with an air of confidence while thinking, How could you write such sick fucking stuff?”

Colonized on Every Level: An Interview with Dodie Bellamy

Dodie Bellamy: “Self-criticism comes in during gaps where I lose my focus, or sometimes when I’m up in front of a room giving a reading and I’m unexpectedly mortified, and there’s nothing else to do but to continue reading with an air of confidence while thinking, How could you write such sick fucking stuff?”

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