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Mother Love Bone ~ Andrew Wood, who influenced the large majority of bands that came out of Seattle in the early 90s, died on this day 23 years ago, just a few short days before Apple was released.

Mother Love Bone ~ Andrew Wood, who influenced the large majority of bands that came out of Seattle in the early 90s, died on this day 23 years ago, just a few short days before Apple was released.

Bone Music: How Banned Western Music in the Soviet Union Was Printed on Repurposed X-Ray Records

Bone Music: How Banned Western Music in the Soviet Union Was Printed on Repurposed X-Ray Records

The world’s oldest flute.  It was carved from the bone of a griffon vulture approximately 35,000 years ago.  Archaeologists found it at Hohle Fels Cave in Germany.

The world’s oldest flute. It was carved from the bone of a griffon vulture approximately 35,000 years ago. Archaeologists found it at Hohle Fels Cave in Germany.

Top marks for resourcefulness and choosing a medium that is oh-so-appropriate for the task at hand. \\m// These must be fascinating objects to behold in person... "Bone Music: How Banned Western Music in the SOviet Union Was Printed on Repurposed X-ray Records"

Top marks for resourcefulness and choosing a medium that is oh-so-appropriate for the task at hand. \\m// These must be fascinating objects to behold in person... "Bone Music: How Banned Western Music in the SOviet Union Was Printed on Repurposed X-ray Records"

In 1950s Soviet Russia, citizens craved Western popular music—everything from jazz to rock & roll. But smuggling vinyl was dangerous, and acquiring the scarce material to make copies of those records that did make it into the country was expensive. An ingenuous solution to this problem began to emerge in the form of “bone music.”

In 1950s Soviet Russia, citizens craved Western popular music—everything from jazz to rock & roll. But smuggling vinyl was dangerous, and acquiring the scarce material to make copies of those records that did make it into the country was expensive. An ingenuous solution to this problem began to emerge in the form of “bone music.”

Bone Music In 1950s Soviet Russia, citizens craved Western popular music—everything from jazz to rock & roll. But smuggling vinyl was dangerous, and acquiring the scarce material to make copies of those records that did make it into the country was expensive. An ingenuous solution to this problem began to emerge in the form of “bone music.”

Bone Music In 1950s Soviet Russia, citizens craved Western popular music—everything from jazz to rock & roll. But smuggling vinyl was dangerous, and acquiring the scarce material to make copies of those records that did make it into the country was expensive. An ingenuous solution to this problem began to emerge in the form of “bone music.”

Bone Music: How Banned Western Music in the Soviet Union Was Printed on Repurposed X-Ray Records

Bone Music: How Banned Western Music in the Soviet Union Was Printed on Repurposed X-Ray Records

IN 1950s Soviet Russia, citizens craved Western popular music—everything from jazz to rock & roll. But smuggling vinyl was dangerous, and acquiring the scarce material to make copies of those records that did make it into the country was expensive.  An ingenuous solution to this problem began to emerge in the form of “bone music.”

IN 1950s Soviet Russia, citizens craved Western popular music—everything from jazz to rock & roll. But smuggling vinyl was dangerous, and acquiring the scarce material to make copies of those records that did make it into the country was expensive. An ingenuous solution to this problem began to emerge in the form of “bone music.”

In 1950s Soviet Russia, citizens craved Western popular music—everything from jazz to rock & roll. But smuggling vinyl was dangerous, and acquiring the scarce material to make copies of those records that did make it into the country was expensive. An ingenuous solution to this problem began to emerge in the form of “bone music.”

In 1950s Soviet Russia, citizens craved Western popular music—everything from jazz to rock & roll. But smuggling vinyl was dangerous, and acquiring the scarce material to make copies of those records that did make it into the country was expensive. An ingenuous solution to this problem began to emerge in the form of “bone music.”

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