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Barthel Beham (German, 1502–1540). Child with Three Skulls, early 16th century…

Barthel Beham (German, 1502–1540). Child with Three Skulls, early 16th century…

Netsuke of Skeleton beating a drum (18th century). Japan. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.Bequest of Stephen Whitney Phoenix, 1881 (81.1.109).

Netsuke of Skeleton beating a drum (18th century). Japan. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.Bequest of Stephen Whitney Phoenix, 1881 (81.1.109).

Rosary, ca. 1500–1525. German. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 (17.190.306) #Halloween

Rosary, ca. 1500–1525. German. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 (17.190.306) #Halloween

Skeleton Dance Costume, late 19th or early 20th century. Tibet. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. Edward A. Nis, 1934 (34.80.3a–h)

Skeleton Dance Costume, late 19th or early 20th century. Tibet. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. Edward A. Nis, 1934 (34.80.3a–h)

Rosary Terminal Bead with Lovers and Death's Head, ca. 1500–1525. Made in North France or South Netherlands. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 (17.190.305) | Here, the striking terminal bead announces the constant proximity of death by joining a skull to the pair of vivacious lovers. Such an image is known as a memento mori (reminder of death), as it encourages one to reflect on the transience of life. #skeleton

Rosary Terminal Bead with Lovers and Death's Head, ca. 1500–1525. Made in North France or South Netherlands. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 (17.190.305) | Here, the striking terminal bead announces the constant proximity of death by joining a skull to the pair of vivacious lovers. Such an image is known as a memento mori (reminder of death), as it encourages one to reflect on the transience of life. #skeleton

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