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Purple. The fascinating back story of Lydia on the Women From the Book Blog by Mary Hendren!

Purple. The fascinating back story of Lydia on the Women From the Book Blog by Mary Hendren!

Tyrian Purple - In biblical times, murex snail shells processed a specific way produced a reddish-purple dye considered regal. "Purple" was valuable and was a source of lucre for Phoenician coastal cities of Tyre & Sidon, very cosmopolitan & powerful cities in their day. Acts 16:14-15 talks about Lydia of Thyatira who was a seller of purple.

Tyrian Purple - In biblical times, murex snail shells processed a specific way produced a reddish-purple dye considered regal. "Purple" was valuable and was a source of lucre for Phoenician coastal cities of Tyre & Sidon, very cosmopolitan & powerful cities in their day. Acts 16:14-15 talks about Lydia of Thyatira who was a seller of purple.

Shrine of St. Lydia where she was baptized by Paul in Philippi aka Filippoi: A woman named Lydia, from the city of Thyatira, a seller of purple fabrics, a worshiper of God, was listening; and the Lord opened her heart to respond to the things spoken by Paul. And when she and her household had been baptized, she urged us, saying, “If you have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come into my house and stay.” And she prevailed upon us. -Acts 16:14-15(NAS)

Shrine of St. Lydia where she was baptized by Paul in Philippi aka Filippoi: A woman named Lydia, from the city of Thyatira, a seller of purple fabrics, a worshiper of God, was listening; and the Lord opened her heart to respond to the things spoken by Paul. And when she and her household had been baptized, she urged us, saying, “If you have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come into my house and stay.” And she prevailed upon us. -Acts 16:14-15(NAS)

Historic Dyes Series No. 7 - The Mystery of Imperial Purple Dye

Historic Dyes Series No. 7 - The Mystery of Imperial Purple Dye

Tyrian Purple is a reddish-purple natural dye derived from the secretion produced by a certain species of predatory sea snails in the family Muricidae, a type of rock snail by the name Murex. This dye was possibly first used by the ancient Phoenicians as early as 1570 BC. Tyrian purple was expensive fetching its weight in silver in Asia Minor. The expense meant that purple-dyed textiles became status symbols.

Tyrian Purple is a reddish-purple natural dye derived from the secretion produced by a certain species of predatory sea snails in the family Muricidae, a type of rock snail by the name Murex. This dye was possibly first used by the ancient Phoenicians as early as 1570 BC. Tyrian purple was expensive fetching its weight in silver in Asia Minor. The expense meant that purple-dyed textiles became status symbols.

Dye extracted from murex snails was used to make expensive purplish dyes in ancient times.

Lost 'Biblical Blue' Dye Possibly Found in Ancient Fabric

Dye extracted from murex snails was used to make expensive purplish dyes in ancient times.

LYDIA "We sat down and began to talk with the women who had gathered. One of those women was Lydia, a Gentile God-worshipper from the city of Thyatira, a dealer in purple cloth. As she listened, the Lord enabled her to embrace Paul’s message. Once she and her household were baptized, she urged, 'Now that you have decided that I am a believer in the Lord, come and stay in my house.' And she persuaded us." —Acts 16:13b-15 CEB

LYDIA "We sat down and began to talk with the women who had gathered. One of those women was Lydia, a Gentile God-worshipper from the city of Thyatira, a dealer in purple cloth. As she listened, the Lord enabled her to embrace Paul’s message. Once she and her household were baptized, she urged, 'Now that you have decided that I am a believer in the Lord, come and stay in my house.' And she persuaded us." —Acts 16:13b-15 CEB

ABC 5 (Jerusalem Chronicle) - Livius - Livius.org Articles on ancient history

ABC 5 (Jerusalem Chronicle) - Livius - Livius.org Articles on ancient history

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