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American to the Backbone by Christopher L. Webber

American to the Backbone: The Life of James W. Pennington, the Fugitive Slave Who Became One of the First Black Abolitionists

Youngest soldier in Union Army

*ORION PERSEUS HOWE ~ 14 yr old not only was a Union drummer boy in the Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment, he was also a Medal of Honor recipient for his actions at Vicksburg.

9 Exciting Books You Need to Read to Your Kids About Early America

9 Exciting Books You Need to Read to Your Kids About Early America

9 Exciting Books You Need to Read to Your Kids About Early American--Great living history reads

American Tempest: How the Boston Tea Party Sparked a Revolution by Harlow Giles Unger| On December 16, 1773, an estimated seven dozen men dumped roughly £10,000 worth of tea in Boston Harbor. This symbolic act unleashed a social, political, and economic firestorm throughout the colonies. Combining stellar scholarship with action-packed history, American Tempest reveals the truth behind the legendary event and examines its lasting consequence--the birth of an independent America.

Book: American Tempest: How the Boston Tea Party Sparked a Revolution, by Harlow Giles Unger.

Union soldiers pose on top of Lookout Mountain, c. 1864. This would make me nuts !

Union soldiers pose on top of Lookout Mountain, c. 1864. [573x660]

Harriet Powers (October 29, 1837 – January 1, 1910) was an African American slave, folk artist and quilt maker from rural Georgia. She used traditional appliqué techniques to record local legends, Bible stories, and astronomical events on her quilts. Her work is on display at the National Museum of American History in Washington, DC and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts.

Harriet Powers was an African-American slave, folk artist and quilt maker from rural Georgia. She used traditional appliqué techniques to record local legends, Bible stories, and astronomical events on her quilts.

Albert Woolson: He had banged that same drum far more quickly as a member of the First Minnesota Regiment, Heavy Artillery. At 106, he picked up the sticks only to amuse little Frances Kobus, 3. Woolson died three years later, the last of the 3.1 million who had worn the Blue or the Gray in the American Civil War.

Albert Woolson had banged that same drum far more quickly as a member of the First Minnesota Regiment, Heavy Artillery. At he picked up the sticks only to amuse little Frances Kobus, 3

Civil War veteran salutes with a Boy Scout and a soldier at a gravesite in Oak Woods Cemetery, Chicago, Illinois, Decoration Day, 1927.  Photo: Chicago Daily News from Library of Congress, American Memory

A soldier, a Boy Scout and a Civil War veteran: Decoration Day, Oak Woods Cemetery, Chicago, (Decoration Day now known as Memorial Day)

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