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Van Dyck's portrait of Charles I and Henrietta Maria and their two eldest children (The Greate Peece) from 1632. The painting is part of the Royal Collection

Van Dyck's portrait of Charles I and Henrietta Maria and their two eldest children (The Greate Peece) from 1632. The painting is part of the Royal Collection

Lady Elizabeth Wilbraham (1632-1705) was the first woman architect, and she not only tutored the young genius Christopher Wren, but helped him design 18 of the 52 London churches that were commissioned by him following the Great Fire of London in 1666.

Lady Elizabeth Wilbraham (1632-1705) was the first woman architect, and she not only tutored the young genius Christopher Wren, but helped him design 18 of the 52 London churches that were commissioned by him following the Great Fire of London in 1666.

James Stuart (1612–1655), Duke of Richmond and Lennox, ca. 1634–35  Anthony van Dyck (Flemish, 1599–1641)

James Stuart (1612–1655), Duke of Richmond and Lennox, ca. 1634–35 Anthony van Dyck (Flemish, 1599–1641)

Betrothal portrait of Sybille of Cleves in Red (in Saxon Style), painted by Cranach, 16th Century

Betrothal portrait of Sybille of Cleves in Red (in Saxon Style), painted by Cranach, 16th Century

Anthony van Dyck [Flemish Baroque Era Painter, 1599-1641] Portrait of Lord John Stuart and his brother Lord Bernard Stuart (later Earl of Li...

Anthony van Dyck [Flemish Baroque Era Painter, 1599-1641] Portrait of Lord John Stuart and his brother Lord Bernard Stuart (later Earl of Li...

King Charles I by Gerrit van Honthorst oil on canvas, 1628 30 in. x 25 1/4 in. (762 mm x 641 mm)

King Charles I by Gerrit van Honthorst oil on canvas, 1628 30 in. x 25 1/4 in. (762 mm x 641 mm)

King Charles I of England. During his trial at Westminster Hall Charles refused to recognise the authority of the court arguing that a king was answerable only to God.

King Charles I of England. During his trial at Westminster Hall Charles refused to recognise the authority of the court arguing that a king was answerable only to God.

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