The flight of a plane from the cold war era scrambled the computer systems of a major air traffic control system in Southern California, resulting in region-wide air travel delays affecting hundreds of flights and thousands of passengers. The spy plane’s altitude and route apparently overloaded a computer system called ERAM, which generates display data for air-traffic controllers. Back-up computer systems also failed.   bg

The flight of a plane from the cold war era scrambled the computer systems of a major air traffic control system in Southern California, resulting in region-wide air travel delays affecting hundreds of flights and thousands of passengers. The spy plane’s altitude and route apparently overloaded a computer system called ERAM, which generates display data for air-traffic controllers. Back-up computer systems also failed. bg

An USAF Boeing B-52H Stratofortress starts its engines during a Minimum Interval Takeoff on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Aug. 14, 2014. Common place during the Cold War, a MITO challenges crews to get multiple aircraft airborne as quickly as possible in response to an alert call. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Sean Martin)

An USAF Boeing B-52H Stratofortress starts its engines during a Minimum Interval Takeoff on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Aug. 14, 2014. Common place during the Cold War, a MITO challenges crews to get multiple aircraft airborne as quickly as possible in response to an alert call. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Sean Martin)

Combat veterans of World War 2: a Douglas SBD-5 Dauntless, Mitsubishi A6M5 Zero, and Curtis P-40N Warhawk fly in friendlier times over Chino, California.

Combat veterans of World War 2: a Douglas SBD-5 Dauntless, Mitsubishi A6M5 Zero, and Curtis P-40N Warhawk fly in friendlier times over Chino, California.

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