Explore Alchemy, Menu and more!

www.thesumofmanythings.com

www.thesumofmanythings.com

By: Dan Gentile Credit: Erin Jackson/Thrillist Few breakfast items transcend the sum of their parts quite like the humble pancake. Through some magical feat of morning alchemy, the simple combination of eggs, powder, and sugar creates a steaming platter that’s both fluffy and crispy, sweet and savory

The 21 Best Plates of Pancakes in America

By: Dan Gentile Credit: Erin Jackson/Thrillist Few breakfast items transcend the sum of their parts quite like the humble pancake. Through some magical feat of morning alchemy, the simple combination of eggs, powder, and sugar creates a steaming platter that’s both fluffy and crispy, sweet and savory

The Mathematics of Beauty    The Fibonacci Sequence is a sequence of numbers where each number is the sum of the previous two—i.e., 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34…and so on to infinity. The ratio of one number to the next is approximately 1.61803, which is called “phi”, or the Golden Ratio. It’s not a magical mathematical equation of the universe, but it definitely reflects natural, aesthetically  beautiful patterns.

The Mathematics of Beauty The Fibonacci Sequence is a sequence of numbers where each number is the sum of the previous two—i.e., 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34…and so on to infinity. The ratio of one number to the next is approximately 1.61803, which is called “phi”, or the Golden Ratio. It’s not a magical mathematical equation of the universe, but it definitely reflects natural, aesthetically beautiful patterns.

Nine looks like PHI, the golden mean ratio, and is an upside down 6.  216 is the smallest cube that's also the sum of three cubes 3,4, and 5 cubed to get 6 cubed, 6x6x6= 216 digits add up to 9.

The Number 9

Nine looks like PHI, the golden mean ratio, and is an upside down 6. 216 is the smallest cube that's also the sum of three cubes 3,4, and 5 cubed to get 6 cubed, 6x6x6= 216 digits add up to 9.

Quincunx. This symbol is a special arrangement of five diamond shaped figures held within a square. Traditionally, it was used to infuse the worlds of man, the earth as nature, and the stars. In alchemy, it is used to represent the idea of the whole being more than the sum of its composing parts. The quincunx was also used to describe how each man and woman possesses the four levels of physical elements (man, animal, stone, and plant), but they are able to ascend from these four natural…

Quincunx. This symbol is a special arrangement of five diamond shaped figures held within a square. Traditionally, it was used to infuse the worlds of man, the earth as nature, and the stars. In alchemy, it is used to represent the idea of the whole being more than the sum of its composing parts. The quincunx was also used to describe how each man and woman possesses the four levels of physical elements (man, animal, stone, and plant), but they are able to ascend from these four natural…

How to make pancetta    by rich on November 17, 2010      I’ve skirted around the edges of this recipe for a while now.    It’s not really a recipe, as such…it’s more of a chemistry experiment that involves taking something a bit bland and mediocre, adding some other stuff to it and miraculously transforming it into something that’s way better than the sum of its parts.    It’s really a bit of kitchen alchemy.

How to make pancetta by rich on November 17, 2010 I’ve skirted around the edges of this recipe for a while now. It’s not really a recipe, as such…it’s more of a chemistry experiment that involves taking something a bit bland and mediocre, adding some other stuff to it and miraculously transforming it into something that’s way better than the sum of its parts. It’s really a bit of kitchen alchemy.

“Nothing retains its form; new shapes from old. Nature, the great inventor, ceaselessly contrives. In all creation, be assured, there is no death—no death, but only change and innovation; what we people call birth is but a different new beginning; death is but to cease to be the same. Perhaps this may have moved to that and that to this, yet still the sum of things remains the same.” — Pythagoras

“Nothing retains its form; new shapes from old. Nature, the great inventor, ceaselessly contrives. In all creation, be assured, there is no death—no death, but only change and innovation; what we people call birth is but a different new beginning; death is but to cease to be the same. Perhaps this may have moved to that and that to this, yet still the sum of things remains the same.” — Pythagoras

Pinterest
Search