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A US Marine stops beside the barbed wire fence of an internment camp on Tinian to give a native child some candy - 1944. (Photo by Corporal George Mattson)

A US Marine stops beside the barbed wire fence of an internment camp on Tinian to give a native child some candy - 1944. (Photo by Corporal George Mattson)

The Chamorro people are native to the Mariana Islands, which consist of the United States territory of Guam and the United States Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), including Rota, Tinian and Saipan. Today, a substantial number of Chamorros live in Hawaii, California, Oregon, Washington, Texas, and Nevada.

The Chamorro people are native to the Mariana Islands, which consist of the United States territory of Guam and the United States Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), including Rota, Tinian and Saipan. Today, a substantial number of Chamorros live in Hawaii, California, Oregon, Washington, Texas, and Nevada.

Chamorro (chamoru) is an Austronesian language spoken by about 50,000 people mainly in Guam, and also in the Northern Mariana Islands and the USA. Chamorro contains a huge number of words of Spanish origin and this has lead some to mistakenly believe that it is a Spanish-based Creole. (...)

Chamorro (chamoru) is an Austronesian language spoken by about 50,000 people mainly in Guam, and also in the Northern Mariana Islands and the USA. Chamorro contains a huge number of words of Spanish origin and this has lead some to mistakenly believe that it is a Spanish-based Creole. (...)

Special photo ....Italian girl kisses a soldier.  "War kisses during WWII were the social norms of the time."

Special photo ....Italian girl kisses a soldier. "War kisses during WWII were the social norms of the time."

Towards the end of WWII, the Germans were sending boys between the ages of 14 and 17 into the field. This photo, taken at the end of the war shows a young boy terrified by the sounds of battle. He even wet his pants, poor kid.

Towards the end of WWII, the Germans were sending boys between the ages of 14 and 17 into the field. This photo, taken at the end of the war shows a young boy terrified by the sounds of battle. He even wet his pants, poor kid.

Children. They are the most vulnerable victims of war and genocide. Between 1933 and 1945, millions of children were displaced as a result of persecution by the Nazis and their collaborators. After World War II, relief agencies photographed some of the children who survived to help find their families. Now, more than 65 years later, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum is working to discover what became of these young survivors. Very, very interesting

Children. They are the most vulnerable victims of war and genocide. Between 1933 and 1945, millions of children were displaced as a result of persecution by the Nazis and their collaborators. After World War II, relief agencies photographed some of the children who survived to help find their families. Now, more than 65 years later, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum is working to discover what became of these young survivors. Very, very interesting

Lt. Col. Bertram Kalisch, left, Forest Milles, LI, NY, and Lt. Col. J. K. French, right, Fairfax County, VA, discuss terms of surrender with German Maj. Gen. Erich Elster and his staff at the River Loire.  Although the General is surrendering 20,000 troops, he seems cheerful.  Romorantin, France, 09/15/1944.

Lt. Col. Bertram Kalisch, left, Forest Milles, LI, NY, and Lt. Col. J. K. French, right, Fairfax County, VA, discuss terms of surrender with German Maj. Gen. Erich Elster and his staff at the River Loire. Although the General is surrendering 20,000 troops, he seems cheerful. Romorantin, France, 09/15/1944.

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