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Collective Nouns | Learn English with Demi

Collective Nouns

Adding -ed or -ing to a verb | Learn English with Demi

Adding -ed or -ing to a verb

We normally add -ing to a verb to form its present participle, and -ed to to form its regular simple past. When doing this, we sometimes double the last letter of the verb, as in these examples:

Quick Grammar Lesson: Apostrophe ( ‘s ) | Learn English with Demi

Quick Grammar Lesson: Apostrophe ( ‘s )

Conjugaison essayer au futur simple Simple Conjugaison essayer au futur Argument essay introduction video writing your doctoral dissertation or thesis faster business essay writing list.

BACKIE is the New Selfie | Learn English with Demi

BACKIE is the New Selfie

HAVE and HAVE GOT | Learn English with Demi

HAVE and HAVE GOT

hellolearnenglishwithantriparto: “ hellolearnenglishwithantriparto: “ “Have” and “have got” source: learnenglishwithDemi ” ”

These videos changed the way I think about teaching.

12 Must-See TED Talks for Teachers

Teach Your Child to Read - These videos changed the way I think about teaching. - Give Your Child a Head Start, and.Pave the Way for a Bright, Successful Future.

Quick Grammar Lesson: The Particle ON and OFF in Phrasal Verbs | Learn English with Demi

Quick Grammar Lesson: The Particle ON and OFF in Phrasal Verbs

The Use of SHALL | Learn English with Demi

The Use of SHALL

Hit it Gandalf! Harry Potter 'Thou shall not pass'. Actually, in the Lord of the rings book he says you can not pass.

What do those idioms mean? TIE THE KNOT -- Meaning: to get married! • Tod and Rina will tie the knot next week! I'm so excited for them! GET DUMPED -- Meaning: when someone ends a relationship with...

Idioms Related to Romance

Do you have a crush on idioms? This visual is great for explaining idioms to ELL students or students who are having trouble understanding the double meanings of the idioms. This is important for reading as idioms are used quite often in writing.

Omitting ‘if’ | Learn English with Demi

Omitting ‘if’

Omitting ‘if’ | Learn English with Demi

Underneath or Beneath | Learn English with Demi

Underneath or Beneath

Basically, as prepositions, underneath and beneath mean the same thing: under or below.

Special Case in the Use of Definite Article | Learn English with Demi

Special Case in the Use of Definite Article

Special Case in the Use of Definite Article | Learn English with Demi

10 uncountable nouns which English learners often think are countable | Learn English with Demi

10 uncountable nouns which English learners often think are countable

10 uncountable nouns which English learners often think are countable | Learn English with Demi

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