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Title: Paqusilahl–Qagyuhl Date Created/Published: c1914 November 13. Summary: Dancer representing Paqusilahl (“man of the ground embodiment”), wearing a mask and shirt covered with hemlock boughs, representing paqus, a wild man of the woods.

Title: Hamasilahl–Qagyuhl Date Created/Published: c1914 November 13. Summary: Ceremonial dancer, full-length portrait, standing, wearing mask and a fur garments during the Winter Dance ceremony.

Title: Nuhlimkilaka–Koskimo Date Created/Published: c1914 November 13. Summary: Kwakiutl person wearing an oversize mask and hands representing a forest spirit, Nuhlimkilaka, (“bringer of confusion”).

Title: Hami–Koskimo Date Created/Published: c1914 November 13. Summary: Koskimo person wearing full-body fur garment, oversized gloves and mask of Hami (“dangerous thing”) during the numhlim ceremony.

Date Created/Published: c1914 November 13. Summary: Ceremonial mask worn by a dancer portraying the hunter in Bella Bella mythology who killed the giant man-eating octopus. The dance was performed during Tluwulahu, a four day ceremony prior to the Winter Dance.

Title: Gaaskidi [i.e. Ganaskidi]–Navaho Date Created/Published: c1905 January. Summary: Photo shows a Navajo man wearing mask of Ganaskidi, god of harvests, plenty, and of mists.

Title: Masked dancer–Cowichan Date Created/Published: c1913 June 16. Summary: Dancer wearing oversize mask, three rings of feathers in front of clothing, holding a rattle.

Title: Haschogan (House God) – The Yebichai Hunchback Date Created/Published: [1904] Summary: Photograph shows a Navajo man, half-length, seated, facing front, wearing a ceremonial mask with feathers and with fir or spruce branches forming a wreath around the shoulders.