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Watch: 28-Minute Documentary ‘Six Different Kinds Of Light’ About Stanley Kubrick Cinematographer John Alcott

Watch: 28-Minute Documentary ‘Six Different Kinds Of Light’ About Stanley Kubrick Cinematographer John Alcott

Cybel DP's 15 Unconventional Tips to Making a Low Budget Film More Extravagant

Cybel DP's 15 Unconventional Tips to Making a Low Budget Film More Extravagant

Rare 1960s Audio: Stanley Kubrick’s Big Interview with The New Yorker http://wearespiltmilk.com/?articleid=rare1960saudio:stanleykubricksbiginterviewwiththenewyorker

Rare 1960s Audio: Stanley Kubrick’s Big Interview with The New Yorker http://wearespiltmilk.com/?articleid=rare1960saudio:stanleykubricksbiginterviewwiththenewyorker

John Alcott Barry Lyndon, Cinematography. For Barry Lyndon, director Stanley Kubrick wanted to make the film look as authentic as possible. He worked with DP John Alcott to use only natural light wherever possible. Film was not very sensitive in those days so great skill had to be used to capture these beautiful candle-lit shots.

John Alcott Barry Lyndon, Cinematography. For Barry Lyndon, director Stanley Kubrick wanted to make the film look as authentic as possible. He worked with DP John Alcott to use only natural light wherever possible. Film was not very sensitive in those days so great skill had to be used to capture these beautiful candle-lit shots.

A group of distinguished women cinematographers here http://www.indiewire.com/article/8-female-cinematographers-you-should-know-about-20141104

A group of distinguished women cinematographers here http://www.indiewire.com/article/8-female-cinematographers-you-should-know-about-20141104

Stanley Kubrick “The director’s job is to know what emotional statement he wants a character to convey in his scene or his line. The director’s taste and imagination play a  crucial role in the making of a film. Is it meaningful? Is it believable? Is it interesting? Those are the questions that have to be answered several hundred times a day.”

Stanley Kubrick “The director’s job is to know what emotional statement he wants a character to convey in his scene or his line. The director’s taste and imagination play a crucial role in the making of a film. Is it meaningful? Is it believable? Is it interesting? Those are the questions that have to be answered several hundred times a day.”

Jack Nicholson, Stanley Kubrick, and Shelley Duvall on the set of The Shining (January, 1979)

Jack Nicholson, Stanley Kubrick, and Shelley Duvall on the set of The Shining (January, 1979)

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