Explore Scanning Electron Microscope, 35mm Film and more!

http://www.thecreatorsproject.com/blog/who-needs-a-camera-when-you’ve-got-a-digestive-tract

Students Luke Evans and Josh Lake swallowed film squares and then left their bodies to do the rest for their series Inside Out. This epic adventure caused marks to be made on the film which was then retrieved and scanned using an electron microscope.

Maggot: | 26 Things You Never Want To See Under A Microscope

Funny pictures about Electron microscope image of a maggot. Oh, and cool pics about Electron microscope image of a maggot. Also, Electron microscope image of a maggot photos.

The bejeweled bugs of Hubert Duprat…

The bejeweled bugs of Hubert Duprat…

Artist Hubert Duprat: Caddisfly larvae build protective cases using materials found in their environment. Artist Hubert Duprat supplied them with gold leaf and precious stones. This is what they created.

Archelon, Giant Sea Turtle

The Archelon is the largest sea turtle species ever discovered. It lived during a time when most of North America was covered by a shallow ocean, about million years ago. I LOVE skeletons!

Parasitic crustacean that eats fish tongues and puts itself into oral cavity as a replacement tongue

Parasitic crustacean that eats fish tongues and puts itself into oral cavity as a replacement tongue

Ceratothoa imbricata - The sea-dwelling parasite attacks fish, burrows into it, and then devours its tongue. After eating the tongue, the parasite proceeds to live inside the fish's mouth.

Fertilisation, SEM

Science: Fertilization, SEM Micrograph of a sperm (blue) attempting to penetrate a human egg (orange).

Lahaina Maui: Sand grains from Maui, Hawaii. Gary Greenberg photographs the world, one grain of sand at a time, in A Grain of Sand: Nature's Secret Wonder

Magnifying sand 250 times through a specialised microscope, we can see its true beauty. Grains are made up of crystals, shell fragments and volcanic rock

smiling_tadpole_640_02

:) A tadpole appears to smile for the camera - captured in minute detail using a high-powered electron microscope. British science photographer David Spears placed the tadpole under a lens in his home lab in Kirland, Somerset.

PHOTOGRAPHY / MICROSCOPIC INSECTS by Steve Gschmeissner

Coloured scanning electron micrograph of a house dust mite (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus). Millions of dust mites inhabit the home, feeding on shed skin cells.

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