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Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance - Jean Arp 1917 dada/surrealism. embraced chance as a tool for liberating creativity from rational thought. Frustrated with drawing he drew & would tear it up then lay scraps on floor

Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance - Jean Arp 1917 dada/surrealism. embraced chance as a tool for liberating creativity from rational thought. Frustrated with drawing he drew & would tear it up then lay scraps on floor

Bruce Conner  UNTITLED (34 CARL STREET, SAN FRANCISCO)  January 27, 1968

Bruce Conner UNTITLED (34 CARL STREET, SAN FRANCISCO) January 27, 1968

Bridget Riley: Polarity

Bridget Riley: Polarity

‘Oh Why So Serious‘, by Paul Chan is a satirical take on the human obsession with laws, imposed meanings of freedom and pleasure, and also the question of free will and angst. If this keyboard is too heavy with philosophical and artistic baggage for your geeky minds, you could try the regular Computer Keyboard we had featured earlier.

Keyboard Cemetery

‘Oh Why So Serious‘, by Paul Chan is a satirical take on the human obsession with laws, imposed meanings of freedom and pleasure, and also the question of free will and angst. If this keyboard is too heavy with philosophical and artistic baggage for your geeky minds, you could try the regular Computer Keyboard we had featured earlier.

Jean (Hans) Arp. Constellation. Meudon 1932 In the early 1930s Arp developed the principle of the “constellation,” employing it in both his writings and artworks. As applied to poetry, the principle involved using a fixed group of words and focusing on the various ways of combining them, a technique that he compared to “the inconceivable multiplicity with which nature arranges a flower species in a field.”1 In making his Constellation reliefs, Arp would first identify a theme—for example…

Jean (Hans) Arp. Constellation. Meudon 1932 In the early 1930s Arp developed the principle of the “constellation,” employing it in both his writings and artworks. As applied to poetry, the principle involved using a fixed group of words and focusing on the various ways of combining them, a technique that he compared to “the inconceivable multiplicity with which nature arranges a flower species in a field.”1 In making his Constellation reliefs, Arp would first identify a theme—for example…

Philadelphia Museum of Art - Collections Object : Comb

Philadelphia Museum of Art - Collections Object : Comb

Marcel Duchamp, Fountain, 1917, Porcelain Urinal, unconfirmed: 36 cm x 48 cm x 61 cm

Marcel Duchamp, Fountain, 1917, Porcelain Urinal, unconfirmed: 36 cm x 48 cm x 61 cm

Marcel Duchamp, The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23

Marcel Duchamp, The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23

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