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Rheinsberg was the estate of Prince Heinrich of Prussia, Frederick the Great’s brother, and featured an early—and quite famous and extensive—folly garden

This elegant rococco pavilion was designed in the late for a small German princely estate by the architect Paul Egell.

Chinoiserie

Sanssouci -The Chinese House, designed by Johann Gottfried Büring between 1755 and a pavilion in the Chinoiserie style: a mixture of rococo elements coupled with Oriental architecture.

Carousel Trianon

The most famous Chinoiserie structure in Ancien Régime France, the Chinese House collapsed in the late along with the Fourth Republic.

Chinese House, Désert de Retz | Architectural Watercolors

The most famous Chinoiserie structure in Ancien Régime France, the Chinese House collapsed in the late along with the Fourth Republic.

Butterfly Bridge

Rheinsberg was the estate of Prince Heinrich of Prussia, Frederick the Great’s brother, and featured an early—and quite famous and extensive—folly garden

Andrew Zega and Bernd H. Dams, watercolor, Pavillon Diane at Trianon

Europeans began building Chinoiserie follies in the early-eighteenth century, adding a touch of whimsical exoticism to their gardens.

Andrew Zega and Bernd H. Dams, watercolor, pagoda at Bonnelles

This small Chinoiserie kiosk stood atop an elaborate rockwork grotto set in a lake and was reached by a rustic, wooden arched bridge.

This elegant rococco pavilion was designed in the late 1750s for a small German princely estate by the architect Paul Egell.

This elegant rococco pavilion was designed in the late for a small German princely estate by the architect Paul Egell.

Architectural Watercolors - Pagoda Rheinsberg2

Rheinsberg was the estate of Prince Heinrich of Prussia, Frederick the Great’s brother, and featured an early—and quite famous and extensive—folly garden

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