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Documenting Selma, From the Inside; James H. Barker/Steven Kasher Gallery, NYTimes.com

Documenting Selma, From the Inside

March 11, 1965 · Selma, Alabama Rev. James Reeb, a Unitarian minister from Boston, was among many white clergymen who joined the Selma marchers after the attack by state troopers at the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Reeb was beaten to death by white men while he walked down a Selma street.

James Reeb, a Unitarian minister from Boston, was among many white clergymen who joined the Selma marchers after the attack by state troopers at the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Reeb was beaten to death by white men while he walked down a Selma street.

Unitarian Universalist minister James Reeb died March 11, 1965 from injuries received two days earlier during the second Selma-to-Montgomery civil rights march. #TodayInBlackHistory

Unitarian Universalist minister James Reeb died March 1965 from injuries received two days earlier during the second Selma-to-Montgomery civil rights march.

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History Was Made In Selma, Alabama Yesterday - Here's The Proof

US-HISTORY-POLITICS-RIGHTS-RACISM

Selma: The 50th Anniversary of Bloody Sunday

History Was Made In Selma, Alabama Yesterday - Here's The Proof

Selma: The Anniversary of Bloody Sunday

Stephen Somerstein Photos in ‘Freedom Journey 1965’ - NYTimes.com

Stephen Somerstein Photos in ‘Freedom Journey 1965’

“Freedom Journey Photographs of the Selma to Montgomery March by Stephen Somerstein” runs through April 19 at the New-York Historical Society.

Fifteen thousand marchers carrying banner stating 'we march with Selma' lead the way on the streets of Harlem, New York in 1965 [Getty Images]

African American children are attacked by dogs and water cannons during a protest against segregation organized by Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth in May 1963 in Birmingham, Alabama

A march of in Harlem in solidarity with the Selma voting rights struggle. Photo: World Telegram & Sun photo by Stanley Wolfson, Library of Congress.

osCurve News: Assignment America: Selma

Fifty years after the police viciously attacked hundreds of marchers in a pivotal moment of the civil rights movement, Selma, Ala., defies neat story lines.

In this March 16, 1965 file photo, mounted state and county police officers ride their horses into a group of demonstrators after they refused to disperse in Montgomery, Ala.

In this March 1965 file photo, mounted state and county police officers ride their horses into a group of demonstrators after they refused to disperse in Montgomery, Ala.

Selma's children: The young marchers who could and did

Selma's children: The young marchers who could and did

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