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Oya is the guardian of the realm between life and death; as such, She is not only the Goddess of spirit communication, funerals and cemeteries but also the Goddess of clairvoyance, psychic abilities, intuition and rebirth. She can call forth the spirit of death, or hold it back - such is the extent of Her power.. Because of Her affiliation to the dead, and Her intense knowledge of the magick arts, Oya is also known as "the Great Mother of the Elders of the Night (Witches)".

Oya is the guardian of the realm between life and death; as such, She is not only the Goddess of spirit communication, funerals and cemeteries but also the Goddess of clairvoyance, psychic abilities, intuition and rebirth. She can call forth the spirit of death, or hold it back - such is the extent of Her power.. Because of Her affiliation to the dead, and Her intense knowledge of the magick arts, Oya is also known as "the Great Mother of the Elders of the Night (Witches)".

Medieval celtic viking dragon hair fork -------------------------------------------(Viking Blog (copy/paste) elDrakkar.blogspot.com)

Medieval celtic viking dragon hair fork -------------------------------------------(Viking Blog (copy/paste) elDrakkar.blogspot.com)

NICEVENN ("Divine" "Brilliant") was a Scottish Samhain Witch-Goddess; equated with the Roman Goddess Diana. In Scotland she is said to ride through the night with her followers at Samhain.

NICEVENN ("Divine" "Brilliant") was a Scottish Samhain Witch-Goddess; equated with the Roman Goddess Diana. In Scotland she is said to ride through the night with her followers at Samhain.

Medieval celtic viking dragon hair fork by theancientmuse on Etsy, $ 90.00

Medieval celtic viking dragon hair fork by theancientmuse on Etsy, $ 90.00

An Irish Celtic Myth, as can be read in the Lebor Gabála Érenn or the Book of Invasions, that one night during Samhain, The Dagda, one of the Tuatha De Danaan, was walking home when he happened upon a beautiful woman bathing in a ford, with nine tresses in her hair. That woman was The Morrigan, and that night they slept together. In exchange, The Morrigan gave The Dagda battle plans and the promise that the Tuatha De Danaan would win the upcoming battle against the Fomorians.

An Irish Celtic Myth, as can be read in the Lebor Gabála Érenn or the Book of Invasions, that one night during Samhain, The Dagda, one of the Tuatha De Danaan, was walking home when he happened upon a beautiful woman bathing in a ford, with nine tresses in her hair. That woman was The Morrigan, and that night they slept together. In exchange, The Morrigan gave The Dagda battle plans and the promise that the Tuatha De Danaan would win the upcoming battle against the Fomorians.

Medieval Wood Carvings, Acanthus, Stave Church Portal Norway

Medieval Wood Carvings, Acanthus, Stave Church Portal Norway

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