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Japanese fisherman and artist, Iori Tomita, uses marine life he receives from fellow fishermen to create what he calls New World Transparent Specimens. They’re sea creatures that have been transformed using preservation techniques and dyes to turn them into see-through shadows of their former selves with their structures highlighted with colour. 1

Japanese fisherman and artist, Iori Tomita, uses marine life he receives from fellow fishermen to create what he calls New World Transparent Specimens. They’re sea creatures that have been transformed using preservation techniques and dyes to turn them into see-through shadows of their former selves with their structures highlighted with colour. 1

Winners | Stanislav Libenský Award 2016: First prize went to Natsuki Katsukawa (Japan) for her work Micro World Specimens, which is inspired by microscopic imaging and is reminiscent of primordial living organisms.

Winners | Stanislav Libenský Award 2016: First prize went to Natsuki Katsukawa (Japan) for her work Micro World Specimens, which is inspired by microscopic imaging and is reminiscent of primordial living organisms.

A former fisherman-turned-artist in Yokohama City, Japan, Tomita creates art using the skeletons of various dead marine specimens, which he preserves and then colors with bright shades of dye. The process strips down each creature to the toughest parts of its remains and Tomita has dyed more than 5,000 dead creatures since 2005, which is amazing, considering each piece takes at least a few weeks to complete, and some up to a year.

A former fisherman-turned-artist in Yokohama City, Japan, Tomita creates art using the skeletons of various dead marine specimens, which he preserves and then colors with bright shades of dye. The process strips down each creature to the toughest parts of its remains and Tomita has dyed more than 5,000 dead creatures since 2005, which is amazing, considering each piece takes at least a few weeks to complete, and some up to a year.

Dyed Transparent Specimens http://5thin.gs/125df4z  Fisherman-turned-artist in Yokohama City, Japan, Tomita

Dyed Transparent Specimens

Dyed Transparent Specimens http://5thin.gs/125df4z Fisherman-turned-artist in Yokohama City, Japan, Tomita

<p>Japanese ex-fisherman who studied ichthyology and now artist: Iori Tomita transforms marine life with scientific technique of preserving and dying organism specimens into an art form with his serie

When Fish Meet Artistic Science

<p>Japanese ex-fisherman who studied ichthyology and now artist: Iori Tomita transforms marine life with scientific technique of preserving and dying organism specimens into an art form with his serie

<p>Japanese ex-fisherman who studied ichthyology and now artist: Iori Tomita transforms marine life with scientific technique of preserving and dying organism specimens into an art form with his serie

When Fish Meet Artistic Science

<p>Japanese ex-fisherman who studied ichthyology and now artist: Iori Tomita transforms marine life with scientific technique of preserving and dying organism specimens into an art form with his serie

Teruya Ohtsuka, National Institute for Physiological Sciences - Myodaiji, Okazaki, Japan  Specimen: Detached retina of red-eared turtle (sp. Pseudemys scripta elegans), showing oil droplets located in the outermost inner segments of cone photoreceptors (400x)  Technique: Darkfield

Teruya Ohtsuka, National Institute for Physiological Sciences - Myodaiji, Okazaki, Japan Specimen: Detached retina of red-eared turtle (sp. Pseudemys scripta elegans), showing oil droplets located in the outermost inner segments of cone photoreceptors (400x) Technique: Darkfield

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