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Vintage Newgrange Ireland Ancient Celtic Rock Art iPhone 6 Case by GratefulArtDesigns

Vintage Newgrange Ireland Ancient Celtic Rock Art iPhone 6 Case by GratefulArtDesigns

Ancient rock art inside the great Neolithic passage tomb at Knowth, Co. Meath

Rock Art Inside the Great Neolithic Tomb at Knowth, County Meath, Ireland

Newgrange stone markings - Ireland

These symbols, found in the sacred mounds of Newgrange, Dowth, Knowth and Loughcrew hold great power and inspiration for me.

The Hill of Tara was the ancient seat of the High Kings of Ireland. There are a multitude of remains on the hill, including a passage mound, the Mound of the Hostages, which dates to between 2500-3000BC, and other earthworks and structures.

The Hill of Tara was the ancient seat of the High Kings of Ireland. There are a multitude of remains on the hill, including a passage mound, the Mound of the Hostages, which dates to between and other earthworks and structures.

Cave carvings inside the passage tomb at Loughcrew, Ireland. Older than stonehenge.

Cave carvings inside the passage tomb at Loughcrew, Ireland. Older than stonehenge. Thought to be the tomb of Jeremiah the prophet. Carvings depicting the journey of Jeremiah across the ocean to Ireland.

1,400-900 years ago, Irish Celtic Monks assembled these beehive-shaped stone huts on the rock island of Skellig Michael off the w coast of Ireland. No mortar was used---yet even today these stone huts are still perfectly water-tight! "Skellig" means "Rock". During the Middle Ages high places were often named for the Archangel Michael.

years ago, Irish Celtic Monks assembled these beehive-shaped stone huts on the rock.

Steinzeichnungen . petroglyphs in Newgrange, Ireland

innerbohemienne: “ Newgrange, Ireland ~ This passage tomb is one of the oldest man-made constructions on earth, predating Egypt’s ancient pyramids by some 700 years and fabled Stonehenge by.

The Mullamast Stone, from 500-600 in Ireland. There are 4 blade marks on the left side of the stone and 2 deep ones on top, suggesting that the stone was used as part of a “sword in the stone” kingship ritual. The perpetuation of the importance of the “sword in the stone,” which comes from Arthurian legend, demonstrates the continuity of Celtic rituals even after the arrival of Christianity in Ireland.

The Mullamast Stone, from Ireland. Four blade marks, left side; two deep ones on top, suggest stone's possible use in “sword in the stone” kingship ritual from Arthurian legend.

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