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Atropos - Olle Hjortzberg  1899

Atropos - Olle Hjortzberg 1899 - Atropos or Aisa was in Greek mythology the oldest of the Three Fates, and was known as the "inflexible" or "inevitable".

Posted by i_justdraw : "Atropos" From Greek mythology she is one of the three Moirai goddesses of fate and destiny. Atropos was the oldest of the Three Fates and was known as the "inevitable." She is the Fate that cuts the persons thread of Destiny. She chooses the persons manner of death and and cuts their thread. Atropos is available through Hashimoto Contempory Gallery in San Francisco through The Moleskine Show. #drawing #original #art #pencil #graphite #greekgods #originalart…

"Atropos" is an original work of art on Moleskine notebook by Allen Williams

In Greek mythology, Atropos was one of the three Moirae, the Fates, the female deities who supervised fate. Atropos was the fate who cut the thread or web of life with the "abhorred shears." She worked along with Clotho, who spun the thread, and Lachesis, who measured the length. They were the daughters of Zeus and Themis, the goddess of order. The Roman names of the fates are Nona, Decuma, and Morta.

Atropos-one of the three Moirae, the Fates, the female deities who supervised fate. Atropos was the fate who cut the thread or web of life with the "abhorred shears.

Atropos, One of the Fates

A Visual Who's Who of Greek Mythology

Fashion History Costume Bas relief of Atropos, one of the three Moirae, Greek goddesses of fate and destiny, cutting the thread of life.

One of the Three Fates, Atropos, often called "the Crone" because she appears as an old woman, is responsible for cutting the life threads of mortals when it is time for them to die. She once told Ares that she would not cut Hercules's thread, as Zeus had decreed that no single God could order his death. (HTLJ "Judgment Day").

Atropos

One of the Three Fates, Atropos, often called "the Crone" because she appears as an old woman.

Then finally we have Atropos, "The Inevitable," (dun dun duuuuunnnnn) who decides how you will die, and when the time comes she cuts your thread with her scissors, ending your life. Fun stuff, right?

Creating The Fate Sisters

Then finally we have Atropos, "The Inevitable,"…

Relief of the Fates from a sarcophagus for a woman, with a kneeling man on either side beseeching mercy. Detail: Clotho, on the left, holds a distaff and spindle with which she spins the thread of life; Lachesis, in the center, holds a scale for weighing the thread of life and the cornucopia of Fortuna/Tyche; Atropos, on the right, holds an open scroll, probably symbolizing "the book of fate." Mid-2nd century CE. Rome, Palazzo Nuovo (Capitoline Museums).

Relief of the Fates from a sarcophagus for a woman, with a kneeling man on either side beseeching mercy. Detail: Clotho, on the left, holds a distaff and spindle with which she spins the thread of life; Lachesis, in the center, holds a scale for weighing the thread of life and the cornucopia of Fortuna/Tyche; Atropos, on the right, holds an open scroll, probably symbolizing "the book of fate." Mid-2nd century CE. Rome, Palazzo Nuovo (Capitoline Museums).

"Lakhesis and the thread of life (she is one of the Moirai - goddesses of fate in Greek Mythology).   The Moirai are personifications of the inescapable destiny of man. They assign to a person his or her fate. Klotho spins the thread of life, Lakhesis measures it and Atropos cuts it.

Lakhesis and the thread of life (she is one of the Moirai - goddesses of fate in Greek Mythology). The Moirai are personifications of the inescapable destiny of man.

The Greek Fates by Alfred Agache (c. 1885)

Alfred-Pierre Joseph Agache, Les Parques, dernier quart du XIXe s.

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