Explore Albert Einstein, 60th Birth and more!

Explore related topics

Hebrew University of Jerusalem: Albert Einstein's papers

Hebrew University of Jerusalem: Albert Einstein's papers

Albert Einstein // 1879–1955.  Einstein’s complete archives—from personal correspondence with half a dozen lovers to notebooks scribbled with his groundbreaking scientific research—are going online. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, which owns the archive, is pulling never-before seen items from its climate-controlled safe, photographing them in high resolution and posting them on the Internet — offering the public a nuanced and fuller portrait of the man behind the scientific genius.

Albert Einstein // 1879–1955. Einstein’s complete archives—from personal correspondence with half a dozen lovers to notebooks scribbled with his groundbreaking scientific research—are going online. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, which owns the archive, is pulling never-before seen items from its climate-controlled safe, photographing them in high resolution and posting them on the Internet — offering the public a nuanced and fuller portrait of the man behind the scientific genius.

Damani Davis, an archivist with the National Archives, discusses original records pertaining to the District of Columbia Compensated Emancipation Act. In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the act, the National Archives shared rarely seen original records pertaining to the act, including petitions from slaves, with the media.

Documents detail price of D.C. slaves’ freedom

Damani Davis, an archivist with the National Archives, discusses original records pertaining to the District of Columbia Compensated Emancipation Act. In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the act, the National Archives shared rarely seen original records pertaining to the act, including petitions from slaves, with the media.

A farman or imperial directive issued by Mughal emperor Aurangzeb lies in a torn folder at the National Archives of India, New Delhi. The label reads, “It is very badly damaged and broken at places.”

India's Archives: How Did Things Get This Bad?

A farman or imperial directive issued by Mughal emperor Aurangzeb lies in a torn folder at the National Archives of India, New Delhi. The label reads, “It is very badly damaged and broken at places.”

Archivists aim to keep the original order of collections, if possible. We re-house materials in acid free / lignin free boxes and folders for their safekeeping. (Unfortunately, not all of us have handwriting that is as neat as that pictured from the folks in the Cambridge Room at the Cambridge Public Library in Massachusetts.)

What does an Archivist Do?

Archivists aim to keep the original order of collections, if possible. We re-house materials in acid free / lignin free boxes and folders for their safekeeping. (Unfortunately, not all of us have handwriting that is as neat as that pictured from the folks in the Cambridge Room at the Cambridge Public Library in Massachusetts.)

Archivists care for presidential records in shiny new institutions. "The Bush Library includes a huge amount of archive materials from George W. Bush’s presidency, but such records are only part of the George W. Bush Presidential Center."

Archivists care for presidential records in shiny new institutions. "The Bush Library includes a huge amount of archive materials from George W. Bush’s presidency, but such records are only part of the George W. Bush Presidential Center."

BBC News - Stasi files: The world's biggest jigsaw puzzle

Stasi files: The world's biggest jigsaw puzzle

BBC News - Stasi files: The world's biggest jigsaw puzzle

State Archivist Steve Excell stands in the stacks of overflow documents from the Washington State Archives that are now being stored at the active records building in Olympia, Wash.,

State Archivist Steve Excell stands in the stacks of overflow documents from the Washington State Archives that are now being stored at the active records building in Olympia, Wash.,

Archivists help celebrate anniversaries. "Experts at Oxford's Bodleian Library have put 43,000 pages from [Queen Victoria's] 141 journals on a website. The journals had only previously been accessible by appointment at the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle. Created to mark this year's Diamond Jubilee, it has taken staff from the library eight months to produce the 43,000 pages."

Queen Victoria's personal journals published online

Archivists help celebrate anniversaries. "Experts at Oxford's Bodleian Library have put 43,000 pages from [Queen Victoria's] 141 journals on a website. The journals had only previously been accessible by appointment at the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle. Created to mark this year's Diamond Jubilee, it has taken staff from the library eight months to produce the 43,000 pages."

Pinterest
Search