Island Inn is strategically located at the outer point of the Sanibel Island barrier reef, where birds, shells and miles of sandy beaches are found in abundance. Spectacular, world-class shelling is the number one reason shellers visit the historic Island Inn. #Shelling #IslandInn #Sanibel http://www.islandinnsanibel.com/things-to-do/shelling/

Island Inn is strategically located at the outer point of the Sanibel Island barrier reef, where birds, shells and miles of sandy beaches are found in abundance. Spectacular, world-class shelling is the number one reason shellers visit the historic Island Inn. #Shelling #IslandInn #Sanibel http://www.islandinnsanibel.com/things-to-do/shelling/

Shelling at sunset is the perfect end to a perfect day. www.islandinnsanibel.com Photo Credit: Pam Rambo @ iloveshelling.com

Shelling at sunset is the perfect end to a perfect day. www.islandinnsanibel.com Photo Credit: Pam Rambo @ iloveshelling.com

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from Facebook

There's even a name for the bent over posture of the people who you see walking on the beach looking for treasures:  THE SANIBELSTOOP.  Been there done that.

There's even a name for the bent over posture of the people who you see walking on the beach looking for treasures: THE SANIBELSTOOP. Been there done that.

One of my favorite places on earth is Blind Pass beaches, both sides of the cut dividing the Islands of Sanibel and Captiva!  Wade the shallow Gulf waters and look for shells!

One of my favorite places on earth is Blind Pass beaches, both sides of the cut dividing the Islands of Sanibel and Captiva! Wade the shallow Gulf waters and look for shells!

Sunset at Blind Pass Captiva Turner Beach

Sunset at Blind Pass Captiva Turner Beach

Tropical storm Andrea sure put a damper on the first few days of our vacation. But she dredged up more shells than we have ever seen on our many visits to our favorite island. The beach was littered with hundreds of Florida Fighting Conchs (Strombus alatus), all creeping along slowly at low tide. It was an awesome sight.  I did not gather and pose these shells. They were just one cluster of the hundreds on the beach that night.

Tropical storm Andrea sure put a damper on the first few days of our vacation. But she dredged up more shells than we have ever seen on our many visits to our favorite island. The beach was littered with hundreds of Florida Fighting Conchs (Strombus alatus), all creeping along slowly at low tide. It was an awesome sight. I did not gather and pose these shells. They were just one cluster of the hundreds on the beach that night.

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