Rakuten: The impossible stick ornamental hairpin (ornamental hairpin) tortoise shell style goldfish black / white coming-of-age ceremony wedding ceremony hair ornament graduation ceremony party Seven-Five-Three Festival is in Japanese dress- Shopping Japanese products from Japan

Rakuten: The impossible stick ornamental hairpin (ornamental hairpin) tortoise shell style goldfish black / white coming-of-age ceremony wedding ceremony hair ornament graduation ceremony party Seven-Five-Three Festival is in Japanese dress- Shopping Japanese products from Japan

Lucien Gaillard hair comb "Aubépines," small white flowers on a hawthorn tree. The comb is horn. The white flowers are mother of pearl with diamonds. Gold drops are sprinkled on the horn to portray the leaves just after rain. | c. 1902 -1904 | Musée d'Orsay

Lucien Gaillard hair comb "Aubépines," small white flowers on a hawthorn tree. The comb is horn. The white flowers are mother of pearl with diamonds. Gold drops are sprinkled on the horn to portray the leaves just after rain. | c. 1902 -1904 | Musée d'Orsay

China | Collection of gilt metal and Kingfisher feather hairpins; variously formed as insects, bats, birds, flowers and shou characters, some decorated with small pearls and coloured stones, 17.5cm max | Qing Dynasty | 2'600£ ~ sold (May '15)

China | Collection of gilt metal and Kingfisher feather hairpins; variously formed as insects, bats, birds, flowers and shou characters, some decorated with small pearls and coloured stones, 17.5cm max | Qing Dynasty | 2'600£ ~ sold (May '15)

India | Hair ornament; Gold, backed with silver and interior filled with lac. | Bangalore, ca. 1880

Hair ornament

India | Hair ornament; Gold, backed with silver and interior filled with lac. | Bangalore, ca. 1880

Hair comb of a tortoiseshell Japanese wedding set that has a family crest of three ivy leaves. This symbol was used on samurai flags and became popular after the 8th shogun of the Tokugawa family, who ruled the Edo era. Their trade policies isolated Japan and its art from the world. Earlier Tokugawa family crests used maple leaves

Hair comb of a tortoiseshell Japanese wedding set that has a family crest of three ivy leaves. This symbol was used on samurai flags and became popular after the 8th shogun of the Tokugawa family, who ruled the Edo era. Their trade policies isolated Japan and its art from the world. Earlier Tokugawa family crests used maple leaves

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