OUR artist, Mr. Davis, some time since sent us a sketch which we reproduce on page 49. It represents our troops in New Orleans “swapping” their rations of flour for tropical fruits and other farm-produce in the markets of New Orleans. Flour has long been extremely scarce at New Orleans; our brave boys, who receive a fair modicum of it daily as part of their ration, manage to dispose of it in market in such a way as, to use their own words, “to live like fighting cocks.” The scene is rather a…

OUR artist, Mr. Davis, some time since sent us a sketch which we reproduce on page 49. It represents our troops in New Orleans “swapping” their rations of flour for tropical fruits and other farm-produce in the markets of New Orleans. Flour has long been extremely scarce at New Orleans; our brave boys, who receive a fair modicum of it daily as part of their ration, manage to dispose of it in market in such a way as, to use their own words, “to live like fighting cocks.” The scene is rather a…

Confederate women had it rough. The price of butter increased 5x, beef 8x, cornmeal 16x and flour a whopping 33x between 1863 and 1865. Richmond women in 1863 became so upset about how hard it was to acquire bread that they rioted through the town breaking windows and causing a general disturbance. Troops had to be called and only under the threat of being fired upon did the crowd disperse leaving more than sixty men and women in prison.

Confederate women had it rough. The price of butter increased 5x, beef 8x, cornmeal 16x and flour a whopping 33x between 1863 and 1865. Richmond women in 1863 became so upset about how hard it was to acquire bread that they rioted through the town breaking windows and causing a general disturbance. Troops had to be called and only under the threat of being fired upon did the crowd disperse leaving more than sixty men and women in prison.

The starving people of New Orleans under Union occupation during the Civil War, 1862

New Orleans

The starving people of New Orleans under Union occupation during the Civil War, 1862

Second Louisiana Colored Regiment, 1863-Assault of the Second Louisiana (Colored) Regiment on the Confederate Works at Port Hudson, May 27th, 1863 From The Soldier in Our Civil War  This print shows the Second Louisiana at the crest of Confederate earth-works. When both sides stood fast, hand-to-hand combat was the result. Gift of Mrs. Ashbell Bennett

Second Louisiana Colored Regiment, 1863-Assault of the Second Louisiana (Colored) Regiment on the Confederate Works at Port Hudson, May 27th, 1863 From The Soldier in Our Civil War This print shows the Second Louisiana at the crest of Confederate earth-works. When both sides stood fast, hand-to-hand combat was the result. Gift of Mrs. Ashbell Bennett

Civil War Navy Sesquicentennial: Battle of New Orleans-USN Takes Over the City

Civil War Navy Sesquicentennial: Battle of New Orleans-USN Takes Over the City

Civil War Navy Sesquicentennial: Battle of New Orleans-USN Takes Over the City

Civil War Navy Sesquicentennial: Battle of New Orleans-USN Takes Over the City

Even after the Union occupation, the majority of New Orleans's white population remained loyal to the Confederate cause and was therefore deeply resentful of the Union presence. Women repeatedly disrespected federal troops, crossing the street to avoid direct contact or gathering up their skirts to signify the avoidance of "dirt." There were also reports of women spitting on Union soldiers and contemptuously leaving streetcars as they came on board,

Even after the Union occupation, the majority of New Orleans's white population remained loyal to the Confederate cause and was therefore deeply resentful of the Union presence. Women repeatedly disrespected federal troops, crossing the street to avoid direct contact or gathering up their skirts to signify the avoidance of "dirt." There were also reports of women spitting on Union soldiers and contemptuously leaving streetcars as they came on board,

'New Orleans is Ours!' | U.S. Naval Battles and Leaders of the Civil War - After surviving battle, dangerous duty awaited Morrison in New Orleans, where he was among the Marines dispatched to take possession of the riotous city. Here: Marines stand guard in front of City Hall on 29 April as the secessionist state flag, which bore a single yellow star and was adopted after Louisiana left the Union and joined the Confederacy, is hauled down.

'New Orleans is Ours!' | U.S. Naval Battles and Leaders of the Civil War - After surviving battle, dangerous duty awaited Morrison in New Orleans, where he was among the Marines dispatched to take possession of the riotous city. Here: Marines stand guard in front of City Hall on 29 April as the secessionist state flag, which bore a single yellow star and was adopted after Louisiana left the Union and joined the Confederacy, is hauled down.

Aquia Creek Landing, Va. Embarkation of 9th Army Corps for Fort Monroe; photograph is by Alexander Gardner. “On February 5, 1863, Sedgwick was succeeded by Maj. Gen. William F. “Baldy” Smith, and on February 12 the corps was ordered to Newport News, where it encamped for a month.” [IX Corps (Union Army) – Wikipedia]

Aquia Creek Landing, Va. Embarkation of 9th Army Corps for Fort Monroe; photograph is by Alexander Gardner. “On February 5, 1863, Sedgwick was succeeded by Maj. Gen. William F. “Baldy” Smith, and on February 12 the corps was ordered to Newport News, where it encamped for a month.” [IX Corps (Union Army) – Wikipedia]

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