Turks Cap (malvaviscus arboreus): This is the hibiscus relative, turk's cap. More than a Turkish fez hat, the flowers look like a whimsical version of an inverted hibiscus. Native to Mexico and parts of southern Texas, Turk's cap has naturalized in central and south Florida. Grows well in full sun or shade, and blooms throughout the summer. Hummingbirds love it.

Turks Cap (malvaviscus arboreus): This is the hibiscus relative, turk's cap. More than a Turkish fez hat, the flowers look like a whimsical version of an inverted hibiscus. Native to Mexico and parts of southern Texas, Turk's cap has naturalized in central and south Florida. Grows well in full sun or shade, and blooms throughout the summer. Hummingbirds love it.

Columbine (aquilegia): This might be a columbine perennial native in your area. At this stage, it's impossible to tell for certain, but it will be apparent when the flowers fully open. Please send another photo at that time and we will be glad to take another look.

Columbine (aquilegia): This might be a columbine perennial native in your area. At this stage, it's impossible to tell for certain, but it will be apparent when the flowers fully open. Please send another photo at that time and we will be glad to take another look.

Columbine (aquilegia): This might be a columbine perennial native in your area. At this stage, it's impossible to tell for certain, but it will be apparent when the flowers fully open. Please send another photo at that time and we will be glad to take another look.

Columbine (aquilegia): This might be a columbine perennial native in your area. At this stage, it's impossible to tell for certain, but it will be apparent when the flowers fully open. Please send another photo at that time and we will be glad to take another look.

Foxtail Fern (asparagus densiflorus myers): Your plant appears to be a Myers asparagus, prized for its stiff upright stems that are covered with needlike green leaves. Commonly known as foxtail fern because of its fluffy stems. A slow grower, it prefers full sun or partial shade (where summers are hot) and regular water.

Foxtail Fern (asparagus densiflorus myers): Your plant appears to be a Myers asparagus, prized for its stiff upright stems that are covered with needlike green leaves. Commonly known as foxtail fern because of its fluffy stems. A slow grower, it prefers full sun or partial shade (where summers are hot) and regular water.

Phalenopsis Orchid: Phal's are very easy to grow in the house and a good plant for an orchid beginner. They like morning light and should be grown in  moss or bark but never potting soil. Water once a week if necessary.They will develop aerial roots which you should never cut off. Fertilize lightly while blooming with an orchid fertilizer and never ever let them sit in water. When the blooms are completely done, cut off the flower stem. It will send out a new shoot in a few months if cared…

Phalenopsis Orchid: Phal's are very easy to grow in the house and a good plant for an orchid beginner. They like morning light and should be grown in moss or bark but never potting soil. Water once a week if necessary.They will develop aerial roots which you should never cut off. Fertilize lightly while blooming with an orchid fertilizer and never ever let them sit in water. When the blooms are completely done, cut off the flower stem. It will send out a new shoot in a few months if cared…

Purslane (portulaca oleracea): This lovely summer flowering plant is generally annual in your area, but reseeds freely and shows up year after year. Grows best in plenty of sun, regular water no more than weekly.

Purslane (portulaca oleracea): This lovely summer flowering plant is generally annual in your area, but reseeds freely and shows up year after year. Grows best in plenty of sun, regular water no more than weekly.

Gayfeather Or Blazing Star (liatris spicata): Your photograph appears to be of a gayfeather, a perennial prized for its plumes of purple flowers with distinct stamens. Florists enjoy using them in mixed flower arrangements. As plant, it needs full sun and regular water, but can tolerate poor soil and less water.  Great cut flower and butterfly magnet.  Happy gardening!

Gayfeather Or Blazing Star (liatris spicata): Your photograph appears to be of a gayfeather, a perennial prized for its plumes of purple flowers with distinct stamens. Florists enjoy using them in mixed flower arrangements. As plant, it needs full sun and regular water, but can tolerate poor soil and less water. Great cut flower and butterfly magnet. Happy gardening!

Columbine Skipper: We can't be sure from this photo but this is our best guess.  Hand remove the caterpillars now, before they do any more damage.  Click on the following link for more info: http://blog.pennlive.com/gardening/2008/05/caterpillars_on_columbine.html

Columbine Skipper: We can't be sure from this photo but this is our best guess. Hand remove the caterpillars now, before they do any more damage. Click on the following link for more info: http://blog.pennlive.com/gardening/2008/05/caterpillars_on_columbine.html

Columbine (aquilegia species): ~70 species of often short-lived Buttercup Family perennials that bloom in late spring and early summer. Native to the North Temperate Zone, these like cooler temperatures and a little bit of shade in the afternoon. Best in cool, moist soils with good drainage. The foliage is susceptible to leaf miner damage. When happy these self sow.  Plants in cultivation are often intentional garden hybrids, spontaneous crossing also occurs.  There is also some Nandina…

Columbine (aquilegia species): ~70 species of often short-lived Buttercup Family perennials that bloom in late spring and early summer. Native to the North Temperate Zone, these like cooler temperatures and a little bit of shade in the afternoon. Best in cool, moist soils with good drainage. The foliage is susceptible to leaf miner damage. When happy these self sow. Plants in cultivation are often intentional garden hybrids, spontaneous crossing also occurs. There is also some Nandina…

Oxalis (oxalis species): Your leaves likely belong to the Oxalis genus characterized by three leaflets resembling clover leaves and bearing pink, white, or yellow flowers in spring or summer. Loved by some and yet considered an invasive weed in many areas.  Flowers are followed by seed pods.  You should pull this weed before the pods open and disperse the seed inside or it will eventually take over the area.

Oxalis (oxalis species): Your leaves likely belong to the Oxalis genus characterized by three leaflets resembling clover leaves and bearing pink, white, or yellow flowers in spring or summer. Loved by some and yet considered an invasive weed in many areas. Flowers are followed by seed pods. You should pull this weed before the pods open and disperse the seed inside or it will eventually take over the area.

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