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Sherman Tank. Check out Gable and Morgan's review of Elizabeth Enright's Then There Were Five here: http://chaptersandscenes.wordpress.com/2014/06/14/gable-and-morgan-review-then-there-were-five/

Sherman Tank. Check out Gable and Morgan's review of Elizabeth Enright's Then There Were Five here: http://chaptersandscenes.wordpress.com/2014/06/14/gable-and-morgan-review-then-there-were-five/

M4A3(76) “Sherman” tank of the 31st Tank Battalion, US 7th Armored Division in Germany, c. February 1945. Due to the lack of snow anywhere, we think this would be sometime after the 7th Armored attacked and retook St. Vith, Belgium on January 23rd...

M4A3(76) “Sherman” tank of the 31st Tank Battalion, US 7th Armored Division in Germany, c. February 1945. Due to the lack of snow anywhere, we think this would be sometime after the 7th Armored attacked and retook St. Vith, Belgium on January 23rd...

Sherman Firefly June 1944, France. German Anti-tank crews were trained to fire and focus their fire first on Armored command vehicles and the larger calibre Firefly to knock them out early.

Sherman Firefly June 1944, France. German Anti-tank crews were trained to fire and focus their fire first on Armored command vehicles and the larger calibre Firefly to knock them out early.

In this picture of the Life’s photographer George Silk some American M4 Sherman tanks parked in a field of poppies during the Italian Campaign in August 1944. Note the soldier crouched in the middle of the flowers as a relax moment, but also the gun of the second Sherman traversed as if to counter a possible threat from the side. The date and the landscape suggest the Central Apennines likely during the first operations against the Gothic Line. A question for the armored vehicles expert…

In this picture of the Life’s photographer George Silk some American M4 Sherman tanks parked in a field of poppies during the Italian Campaign in August 1944. Note the soldier crouched in the middle of the flowers as a relax moment, but also the gun of the second Sherman traversed as if to counter a possible threat from the side. The date and the landscape suggest the Central Apennines likely during the first operations against the Gothic Line. A question for the armored vehicles expert…

The 76 mm Gun Motor Carriage (GMC) M18 was an American tank destroyer of World War II. The manufacturer, Buick, gave it the nickname "Hellcat" and it was the fastest tracked armored fighting vehicle during the war with a top speed up to 60 mph. Hellcat crews took advantage of the vehicle's speed to protect against hits to its thin armor. Many German Panther and Tiger tanks were destroyed because they could not turn their turrets fast enough to return fire.

The 76 mm Gun Motor Carriage (GMC) M18 was an American tank destroyer of World War II. The manufacturer, Buick, gave it the nickname "Hellcat" and it was the fastest tracked armored fighting vehicle during the war with a top speed up to 60 mph. Hellcat crews took advantage of the vehicle's speed to protect against hits to its thin armor. Many German Panther and Tiger tanks were destroyed because they could not turn their turrets fast enough to return fire.

M-18 Hellcat Tank Destroyer. The Fastest AFV in all of WW2. Could go 60 mph on good roads

M-18 Hellcat Tank Destroyer. The Fastest AFV in all of WW2. Could go 60 mph on good roads

Leopard 2 Main Battle Tank, Germany  The crew compartment is equipped with a fire and explosion detection and suppression system which has been licensed by Deugra Ges

Leopard 2 Main Battle Tank, Germany The crew compartment is equipped with a fire and explosion detection and suppression system which has been licensed by Deugra Ges

Swedish Army - Stridsvagn 103 - Main Battle Tank (1960s–1997) Crew: 3 (Commander, Gunner/Driver, Rear Driver/Radio Operator) Fully Automated There is no Need for a Loader and Second Driver/Radio Operator Relieves the Commander of Routine Radio Duties – Because he is Facing Rear Ward, this Allows the Tank to be Driven Backwards at the Same Speed as Forward, Keeping the Frontal Armor Toward the Enemy – Armament: 1 x 105mm Bofors L74 Rifled Gun (50 Rounds) 2 x 7.62mm KSP MGs and 1 x 7.62mm AA…

Stridsvagn 103 - the Swedish tank without a turret

Swedish Army - Stridsvagn 103 - Main Battle Tank (1960s–1997) Crew: 3 (Commander, Gunner/Driver, Rear Driver/Radio Operator) Fully Automated There is no Need for a Loader and Second Driver/Radio Operator Relieves the Commander of Routine Radio Duties – Because he is Facing Rear Ward, this Allows the Tank to be Driven Backwards at the Same Speed as Forward, Keeping the Frontal Armor Toward the Enemy – Armament: 1 x 105mm Bofors L74 Rifled Gun (50 Rounds) 2 x 7.62mm KSP MGs and 1 x 7.62mm AA…

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