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Kingston Fossil Plant coal fly ash slurry spill - The confluence of the Clinch and Emory Rivers, with the Kingston Fossil Plant in the distance, five days after the spill. The white foam floating on the water consists of cenospheres, which are a component of the ash.

Kingston Fossil Plant coal fly ash slurry spill - The confluence of the Clinch and Emory Rivers, with the Kingston Fossil Plant in the distance, five days after the spill. The white foam floating on the water consists of cenospheres, which are a component of the ash.

Kingston Fossil Plant coal fly ash slurry spill -A collapsed house inundated by the spill

Kingston Fossil Plant coal fly ash slurry spill -A collapsed house inundated by the spill

Kingston Fossil Plant coal fly ash slurry spill - A 25-foot (7.6 m) wall of ash approximately 1 mile (1.6 km) from the retention pond

Kingston Fossil Plant coal fly ash slurry spill - A 25-foot (7.6 m) wall of ash approximately 1 mile (1.6 km) from the retention pond

It’s Time to Move Beyond Dirty Coal | EcoWatch  - "Post Carbon Institute, Sierra Club, Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition and AlterNet have partnered to show what’s at stake in the fight against coal with a powerful slideshow of recent coal disasters including the Freedom Industries chemical spill, Duke Energy ash spill, West Virginia slurry spill, mountaintop removal mining and more."

It’s Time to Move Beyond Dirty Coal | EcoWatch - "Post Carbon Institute, Sierra Club, Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition and AlterNet have partnered to show what’s at stake in the fight against coal with a powerful slideshow of recent coal disasters including the Freedom Industries chemical spill, Duke Energy ash spill, West Virginia slurry spill, mountaintop removal mining and more."

Aerial photograph of site taken the day after the event. The TVA Kingston Fossil Plant coal fly ash slurry spill occurred just before 1 a.m. on Monday December 22, 2008, when an ash dike ruptured at an 84-acre (0.34 km2) solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston Fossil Plant in Roane County, Tennessee, USA. 1.1 billion US gallons (4,200,000 m3) of coal fly ash slurry was released.

Aerial photograph of site taken the day after the event. The TVA Kingston Fossil Plant coal fly ash slurry spill occurred just before 1 a.m. on Monday December 22, 2008, when an ash dike ruptured at an 84-acre (0.34 km2) solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston Fossil Plant in Roane County, Tennessee, USA. 1.1 billion US gallons (4,200,000 m3) of coal fly ash slurry was released.

Mudslide Aberfan Disaster1966 | The Aberfan Disaster - A Brief Description

Mudslide Aberfan Disaster1966 | The Aberfan Disaster - A Brief Description

Report: River Contaminated With High Levels Of Lead, Arsenic, Mercury After NC Coal Ash Spill     	By Rebecca Leber

Report: River Contaminated With High Levels Of Lead, Arsenic, Mercury After NC Coal Ash Spill By Rebecca Leber

Queensland Labor commits itself to the state’s coal industry, but says new projects need to ‘stack up environmentally’ http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jan/09/queensland-election-2015-labor-support-coal-despite-climate-warning?CMP=share_btn_fb

Queensland election 2015: Labor renews support for coal despite climate warning

Queensland Labor commits itself to the state’s coal industry, but says new projects need to ‘stack up environmentally’ http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jan/09/queensland-election-2015-labor-support-coal-despite-climate-warning?CMP=share_btn_fb

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