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World’s Smallest Snowman

This is the smal.

False color scanning electron microscope image of pollen grains from a variety of common plants: sunflower, morning glory, prairie hollyhock, oriental lily, evening primrose and castor bean.

Why Are Pollen Allergies So Common? Scanning electron microscope image of pollen grains from a variety of common plants: sunflower, morning glory, prairie hollyhock, oriental lily, evening primrose and castor bean.

Neat!  We have our own digital microscope at school to do this, but it'd be neat to peek at bugs we don't have access to in our area.  Link: http://bugscope.beckman.uiuc.edu/

The Bugscope project provides free interactive access to a scanning electron microscope (SEM) so that students anywhere in the world can explore the microscopic world of insects.

It's the most famous corkscrew in history. Now an electron microscope has captured the famous Watson-Crick double helix in all its glory, by imaging threads of DNA resting on a silicon bed of nails. The technique will let researchers see how proteins, RNA and other biomolecules interact with DNA.

DNA Was Photographed for the First Time. Using an electron microscope, Enzo di Fabrizio and his team at the Italian Institute of Technology in Genoa snapped the first photos of the famous double helix.

Electron microscope slow-motion video of vinyl LP shows how records convey sound. Very cool.

Ben Krasnow of Applied Science has posted an extremely close slow-motion look at a needle moving across a vinyl record taken with an electron microscope.

Diatom, a single algae cell with a cell wall made of silica. Taken with a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of diatoms. Diatoms are a major group of algae, and are among the most common types of phytoplankton.

Butterfly wings under an electron microscope

Butterfly Wings Look Completely Crazy Under an Electron Microscope

Destin over at SmarterEveryDay wanted to take an up-close look at the nanostructure of a butterfly's wing, so he took a few samples to be looked at under a scanning electron microscope. The results are fascinatingly beautiful.

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