A queen and a king form part of the medieval Lewis chess sets. Photograph: Murdo MacLeod

A queen and a king form part of the medieval Lewis chess sets. Photograph: Murdo MacLeod

Looking rather glum, the queen cradles her chin with her right hand while her left hand clasps a drinking horn. The back of the piece (pictured right) shows the queen is wearing a veil beneath her crown, which covers her hair, and is sitting on a throne decorated with a foliage design.

Looking rather glum, the queen cradles her chin with her right hand while her left hand clasps a drinking horn. The back of the piece (pictured right) shows the queen is wearing a veil beneath her crown, which covers her hair, and is sitting on a throne decorated with a foliage design.

Carved walrus-ivory game pieces found on the Isle of Lewis in the Hebrides have long been interpreted as chess pieces made in Norway in the last half of the 12th century

Carved walrus-ivory game pieces found on the Isle of Lewis in the Hebrides have long been interpreted as chess pieces made in Norway in the last half of the 12th century

Lewis Chessmen - Article of the Day - English - The Free Dictionary Language Forums

Lewis Chessmen - Article of the Day - English - The Free Dictionary Language Forums

The Lewis Chessmen, carved from walrus ivory and whales teeth (Belonging to a group of 78 pieces found at one site on the Isle of Lewis (Camas Uig) in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, 1831); 12th century, probably made by Viking craftsmen originating in Trondheim, Norway.

The Lewis Chessmen, carved from walrus ivory and whales teeth (Belonging to a group of 78 pieces found at one site on the Isle of Lewis (Camas Uig) in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, 1831); 12th century, probably made by Viking craftsmen originating in Trondheim, Norway.

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