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Make Your Life Less Oily in 2017: Part I, Taking Stock  This article provides an excellent representation of why we need to move to a bioregional based economy and why we need to move to renewable energy sources.

Make Your Life Less Oily in 2017: Part I, Taking Stock This article provides an excellent representation of why we need to move to a bioregional based economy and why we need to move to renewable energy sources.

Media Bites Back: Newspaper Threatens Defamation Suit for GOP Senator Calling Them "Fake News"

Media Bites Back: Newspaper Threatens Defamation Suit for GOP Senator Calling Them "Fake News"

This could be the biggest corporate scandal in history. Join the call to demand investigations into Exxon's lies on climate change.

This could be the biggest corporate scandal in history. Join the call to demand investigations into Exxon's lies on climate change.

A real agenda for working people: What Trump would do if he were serious about creating jobs, raising wages, and fixing our rigged economy | Economic Policy Institute

A real agenda for working people: What Trump would do if he were serious about creating jobs, raising wages, and fixing our rigged economy | Economic Policy Institute

Left to its own defenses, a farm field growing a variety of plants tends to attract fewer insect pests than a field growing just one type of crop. While scientists and farmers have noted that difference for years, the reasons behind it have been poorly understood. A new study explains that much of it may have to do with the nutritional needs of insects. Returning plant diversity to farmland could be a key step toward sustainable pest control.

Why insect pests love monocultures, and how plant diversity could change that

Left to its own defenses, a farm field growing a variety of plants tends to attract fewer insect pests than a field growing just one type of crop. While scientists and farmers have noted that difference for years, the reasons behind it have been poorly understood. A new study explains that much of it may have to do with the nutritional needs of insects. Returning plant diversity to farmland could be a key step toward sustainable pest control.

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