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Japanese artist Iori Tomita combines art and science in his series, New World Transparencies. Tomita soaks his specimens in a mixture of blue stain, ethyl alcohol, and glacial acetic acid before using the enzyme trypsin to breakdown muscles. He dyes the organisms with red dye and potassium hydroxide and then preserves them in glycerine. His intriguing art is vivid and almost other-worldly.

Japanese artist Iori Tomita combines art and science in his series, New World Transparencies. Tomita soaks his specimens in a mixture of blue stain, ethyl alcohol, and glacial acetic acid before using the enzyme trypsin to breakdown muscles. He dyes the organisms with red dye and potassium hydroxide and then preserves them in glycerine. His intriguing art is vivid and almost other-worldly.

Merret St. John by Mandy Saile

Merret St. John by Mandy Saile

Félix Bracquemond (French, Paris 1833–1914 Sèvres). The Monkey and the Cat, from the Fables of La Fontaine, 1886. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York. The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1962 (62.625.16(1)) #cats

Félix Bracquemond (French, Paris 1833–1914 Sèvres). The Monkey and the Cat, from the Fables of La Fontaine, 1886. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York. The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1962 (62.625.16(1)) #cats

Leonie Oakes, large figure 1, "weaver of dreams" series.  Etching, linocut and letterpress; Hand printed on Japanese kozo paper, antique paper, stitching and thread.

Leonie Oakes, large figure 1, "weaver of dreams" series. Etching, linocut and letterpress; Hand printed on Japanese kozo paper, antique paper, stitching and thread.