Spot shooting stars from the North Taurid meteor shower, Venus near a brilliant star cluster, and the full moon sharing the sky with the Ple...

Spot shooting stars from the North Taurid meteor shower, Venus near a brilliant star cluster, and the full moon sharing the sky with the Ple...

The Seven Sisters (or Pleiades) in the Taurus #constellation. #space #astronomy

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The Seven Sisters (or Pleiades) in the Taurus #constellation. #space #astronomy

Magellanic Cloud Survey view of the Tarantula Nebula | The leader of the survey team, Maria-Rosa Cioni (University of Hertfordshire, UK) explains: "This view is of one of the most important regions of star formation in the local Universe, the spectacular 30 Doradus star-forming region, also called the Tarantula Nebula. At its core is a large cluster of stars called RMC 136, in which some of the most massive stars known are located."

Magellanic Cloud Survey view of the Tarantula Nebula | The leader of the survey team, Maria-Rosa Cioni (University of Hertfordshire, UK) explains: "This view is of one of the most important regions of star formation in the local Universe, the spectacular 30 Doradus star-forming region, also called the Tarantula Nebula. At its core is a large cluster of stars called RMC 136, in which some of the most massive stars known are located."

A Hubble Space Telescope image of the R136 super star cluster, near the center of the 30 Doradus Nebula, also known as the Tarantula Nebula or NGC 2070.

A Hubble Space Telescope image of the R136 super star cluster, near the center of the 30 Doradus Nebula, also known as the Tarantula Nebula or NGC 2070.

The Wizard Nebula ~ NGC 7380 is an open cluster discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1787. It is located in the constellation Cepheus about 7,000 light-years from Earth, within the Milky Way Galaxy. The star cluster is embedded in a nebula, which spans some 110 light-years. The stars of Wizard Nebula have emerged from this star-forming region in the last 5 million years or so, making it a relatively young cluster.

The Wizard Nebula ~ NGC 7380 is an open cluster discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1787. It is located in the constellation Cepheus about 7,000 light-years from Earth, within the Milky Way Galaxy. The star cluster is embedded in a nebula, which spans some 110 light-years. The stars of Wizard Nebula have emerged from this star-forming region in the last 5 million years or so, making it a relatively young cluster.

The star Mira, with its 13-light-year-long tail, zips through the galaxy at 291,000 miles per hour! This image was made from several Galaxy Evolution Explorer images put together into a mosaic.

The star Mira, with its 13-light-year-long tail, zips through the galaxy at 291,000 miles per hour! This image was made from several Galaxy Evolution Explorer images put together into a mosaic.

"Perhaps the most famous star cluster on the sky, the bright stars of the Pleiades can be seen without binoculars from even the depths of a light-polluted city..."

"Perhaps the most famous star cluster on the sky, the bright stars of the Pleiades can be seen without binoculars from even the depths of a light-polluted city..."

This stellar swarm is M80 (NGC 6093), one of the densest of the 147 known globular star clusters in the Milky Way galaxy. Located about 28,000 light-years from Earth, M80 contains hundreds of thousands of stars, all held together by their mutual gravitational attraction. Globular clusters are particularly useful for studying stellar evolution, since all of the stars in the cluster have the same age (about 15 billion years), but cover a range of stellar masses.

This stellar swarm is M80 (NGC 6093), one of the densest of the 147 known globular star clusters in the Milky Way galaxy. Located about 28,000 light-years from Earth, M80 contains hundreds of thousands of stars, all held together by their mutual gravitational attraction. Globular clusters are particularly useful for studying stellar evolution, since all of the stars in the cluster have the same age (about 15 billion years), but cover a range of stellar masses.

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