studio portrait shows vaudeville performer, Kate Rickards, costumed as Tootsie Sloper, the principal female character in The Land Lubber: a Nautical Nightmare, a farcical comedy written especially for Rickards by Garnet Walch.

studio portrait shows vaudeville performer, Kate Rickards, costumed as Tootsie Sloper, the principal female character in The Land Lubber: a Nautical Nightmare, a farcical comedy written especially for Rickards by Garnet Walch.

85/1286-498 Glass negative, full plate, 'Mrs H Rickards as Toots', unattributed studio, Sydney, Australia, c. 1880-1923

85/1286-498 Glass negative, full plate, 'Mrs H Rickards as Toots', unattributed studio, Sydney, Australia, c. 1880-1923

LOTTA CRABTREE, variety star (1847-1924) Vivacious Lotta was a true child of the Gold Rush. She sang and danced in gold mining camps from the age of nine and held fond ties to San Francisco long after becoming New York's highest-paid stage star. She gave the city an ornate water fountain that survived the 1906 earthquake and still stands today at Market and Kearny Streets.  Photo: SF Performing Arts Library and Museum

The Myth of a Myth: Brushing Your Hair 100 Times

LOTTA CRABTREE, variety star (1847-1924) Vivacious Lotta was a true child of the Gold Rush. She sang and danced in gold mining camps from the age of nine and held fond ties to San Francisco long after becoming New York's highest-paid stage star. She gave the city an ornate water fountain that survived the 1906 earthquake and still stands today at Market and Kearny Streets. Photo: SF Performing Arts Library and Museum

stuff for the office

stuff for the office

1926: Ginger Rogers, fifteen, performs “The Valencia” in Vaudeville.

1926: Ginger Rogers, fifteen, performs “The Valencia” in Vaudeville.

full_product_image_2255_0_Vaudeville Team 1930s.jpeg 377×561 pixels

full_product_image_2255_0_Vaudeville Team 1930s.jpeg 377×561 pixels

Williams and Walker were one of the few all-black acts allowed to perform on white vaudeville stages | The Vaudeville Actress Who Refused To Be A Stereotype

Williams and Walker were one of the few all-black acts allowed to perform on white vaudeville stages

Williams and Walker were one of the few all-black acts allowed to perform on white vaudeville stages | The Vaudeville Actress Who Refused To Be A Stereotype

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