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'An Evening of Chinese and Japanese Ghost Stories' in Thomaston

'An Evening of Chinese and Japanese Ghost Stories' in Thomaston

Oitekebori, Japanese yokai: Oitekebori is a mysterious apparition that was seen in Honjo, Sumida ward, Tokyo. It takes the form of a human ghost, and haunts fishermen and others who stray too close to its home in the canals. Its name derives from a slang version of the phrase, “oite ike!” meaning, “drop it and get out of here!”

Oitekebori, Japanese yokai: Oitekebori is a mysterious apparition that was seen in Honjo, Sumida ward, Tokyo. It takes the form of a human ghost, and haunts fishermen and others who stray too close to its home in the canals. Its name derives from a slang version of the phrase, “oite ike!” meaning, “drop it and get out of here!”

mujina - Jonathan Wakude Fischer draws inspiration for his series Digital Superstitions from Japanese Ghost stories such as this mujina, a faceless ghost!

mujina - Jonathan Wakude Fischer draws inspiration for his series Digital Superstitions from Japanese Ghost stories such as this mujina, a faceless ghost!

Ghost of Okiku, 1857 - Fantastic scene from the kabuki play “Minori yoshi kogane no kikuzuki,” based on the famous ghost story of Okiku and the Dish Mansion. The evil samurai Asayama Tetsuzan falsely accused the maid Okiku of losing one dish from a valuable ten-piece set. He orders his retainer Iwabuchi to torture her, dropping her into a well, trying to make her agree to his advances. If she accepts his proposition, the missing dish will be forgiven, but Okiku refuses and the pair…

Ghost of Okiku, 1857 - Fantastic scene from the kabuki play “Minori yoshi kogane no kikuzuki,” based on the famous ghost story of Okiku and the Dish Mansion. The evil samurai Asayama Tetsuzan falsely accused the maid Okiku of losing one dish from a valuable ten-piece set. He orders his retainer Iwabuchi to torture her, dropping her into a well, trying to make her agree to his advances. If she accepts his proposition, the missing dish will be forgiven, but Okiku refuses and the pair…

The Ghost of Kohada Koheiji, from the series One Hundred Ghost Stories (Hyaku monogatari)  「百物語 こはだ小平二」  Japanese, Edo period, about 1831–32 (Tenpô 2–3)  Artist Katsushika Hokusai, Japanese, 1760–1849, Woodblock print (nishiki-e); ink and color on paper, MFA

The Ghost of Kohada Koheiji, from the series One Hundred Ghost Stories (Hyaku monogatari) 「百物語 こはだ小平二」 Japanese, Edo period, about 1831–32 (Tenpô 2–3) Artist Katsushika Hokusai, Japanese, 1760–1849, Woodblock print (nishiki-e); ink and color on paper, MFA

The Ghost of Oiwa (Oiwa-san), from the series One Hundred Ghost Stories (Hyaku monogatari)  「百物語 お岩さん」  Japanese, Edo period, about 1831–32 (Tenpô 2–3)  Artist Katsushika Hokusai, Japanese, 1760–1849, Woodblock print (nishiki-e); ink and color on paper, MFA

The Ghost of Oiwa (Oiwa-san), from the series One Hundred Ghost Stories (Hyaku monogatari) 「百物語 お岩さん」 Japanese, Edo period, about 1831–32 (Tenpô 2–3) Artist Katsushika Hokusai, Japanese, 1760–1849, Woodblock print (nishiki-e); ink and color on paper, MFA

The Mansion of the Plates (Sara yashiki), from the series One Hundred Ghost Stories (Hyaku monogatari)  「百物語 さらやしき」  Japanese, Edo period, about 1831–32 (Tenpô 2–3)  Artist Katsushika Hokusai, Japanese, 1760–1849, Woodblock print (nishiki-e); ink and color on paper, MFA

The Mansion of the Plates (Sara yashiki), from the series One Hundred Ghost Stories (Hyaku monogatari) 「百物語 さらやしき」 Japanese, Edo period, about 1831–32 (Tenpô 2–3) Artist Katsushika Hokusai, Japanese, 1760–1849, Woodblock print (nishiki-e); ink and color on paper, MFA

Yotsuya Kaidan, supposedly the most famous and influential Japanese ghost story of all time

Yotsuya Kaidan, supposedly the most famous and influential Japanese ghost story of all time

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