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Chicago's Unsung Heroes These nine people are working tirelessly to help end the violence in the Windy City.

Chicago's Unsung Heroes These nine people are working tirelessly to help end the violence in the Windy City.

Hero Arts Evening Dress Opera Coat Party Pearls 3 Stamp Art Deco Roaring 20s Set - Google Search

Hero Arts Evening Dress Opera Coat Party Pearls 3 Stamp Art Deco Roaring 20s Set - Google Search

"Powerful people cannot afford to educate the people they oppress...because once you are truly educated, you will not ask for power, you will take it" ~John Henrik Clarke

"Powerful people cannot afford to educate the people they oppress...because once you are truly educated, you will not ask for power, you will take it" ~John Henrik Clarke

Robert Tanner Freeman is the first professionally trained black dentist in the United States. A child of slaves, he eventually entered Harvard University and graduated only four years after the end of the Civil War on May 18, 1869.

Robert Tanner Freeman is the first professionally trained black dentist in the United States. A child of slaves, he eventually entered Harvard University and graduated only four years after the end of the Civil War on May 18, 1869.

October 16, 1859:  Abolitionist John Brown leads 18 men in an attack on the Harpers Ferry armory.  The raid to seize the weapons failed and Brown was captured, tried, and hung.  At his trial, Brown said:  "Now, if it is deemed necessary that I should forfeit my life for the furtherance of the ends of justice, and mingle my blood...with the blood of millions in this slave country whose rights are disregarded by wicked, cruel, and unjust enactments, I submit; so let it be done!"

October 16, 1859: Abolitionist John Brown leads 18 men in an attack on the Harpers Ferry armory. The raid to seize the weapons failed and Brown was captured, tried, and hung. At his trial, Brown said: "Now, if it is deemed necessary that I should forfeit my life for the furtherance of the ends of justice, and mingle my blood...with the blood of millions in this slave country whose rights are disregarded by wicked, cruel, and unjust enactments, I submit; so let it be done!"

Wallace Rayfield (1873 - 1941)    While Wallace Augustus Rayfield was a student at Columbia University, Booker T. Washington recruited him to head the Architectural and Mechanical Drawing Department at Tuskegee Institute in Macon County, Alabama. After a few years, Rayfield opened his own practice in Birmingham, Alabama, where he designed many homes and churches. Rayfield was the second professionally-educated black architect in the United States.

Wallace Rayfield (1873 - 1941) While Wallace Augustus Rayfield was a student at Columbia University, Booker T. Washington recruited him to head the Architectural and Mechanical Drawing Department at Tuskegee Institute in Macon County, Alabama. After a few years, Rayfield opened his own practice in Birmingham, Alabama, where he designed many homes and churches. Rayfield was the second professionally-educated black architect in the United States.

Nathan Francis Mossell (1856-1946) was an African American doctor who helped establish the first black hospital in Philadelphia.

Nathan Francis Mossell (1856-1946) was an African American doctor who helped establish the first black hospital in Philadelphia.

Langston, Charles Henry (1817-1892) Charles Henry Langston, the grandfather of poet Langston Hughes, was born a free man on a Virginia plantation in 1817 to Captain Ralph Quarles and Lucy Jane Langston, Quarles� mulatto slave. He had two brothers, John Mercer (who would become a Virginia Congressman in 1888) and Gideon. After the death of his father in 1834, Charles inherited a large part of his father�s estate, and he went to be educated at Oberlin College in 1842 and 1843.

Langston, Charles Henry (1817-1892) Charles Henry Langston, the grandfather of poet Langston Hughes, was born a free man on a Virginia plantation in 1817 to Captain Ralph Quarles and Lucy Jane Langston, Quarles� mulatto slave. He had two brothers, John Mercer (who would become a Virginia Congressman in 1888) and Gideon. After the death of his father in 1834, Charles inherited a large part of his father�s estate, and he went to be educated at Oberlin College in 1842 and 1843.

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