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52 Colorized Historical Photos That Give Us A New Look At the Past President Lincoln with Major General McClernand and Allan Pinkerton at Antietam in 1862

52 Colorized Historical Photos That Give Us A New Look At the Past President Lincoln with Major General McClernand and Allan Pinkerton at Antietam in 1862

Taken in 1862 during the American Civil War, Lieutenant George Custer sits with his charges from the 2nd U.S. Cavalry in this colorized photograph.

Taken in 1862 during the American Civil War, Lieutenant George Custer sits with his charges from the 2nd U.S. Cavalry in this colorized photograph.

Wadlow was a Freemason. In 1939, he petitioned Franklin Lodge #25 in Alton, Illinois, and by late November of that year[8] was raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Illinois A.F & A.M. Wadlow's Freemason ring was the largest ever made.

Wadlow was a Freemason. In 1939, he petitioned Franklin Lodge #25 in Alton, Illinois, and by late November of that year[8] was raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Illinois A.F & A.M. Wadlow's Freemason ring was the largest ever made.

July 2, 1776: The Continental Congress passed Virginia Delegate Richard Henry Lee’s resolution that “these united Colonies are, and of right, ought to be, Free and Independent States.” They then spent two days over the wording of Jefferson’s document, The United States Declaration of Independence, before signing and ratifying it on July 4, 1776.

July 2, 1776: The Continental Congress passed Virginia Delegate Richard Henry Lee’s resolution that “these united Colonies are, and of right, ought to be, Free and Independent States.” They then spent two days over the wording of Jefferson’s document, The United States Declaration of Independence, before signing and ratifying it on July 4, 1776.

Mary Fields aka Stagecoach Mary. The first African American woman to be a mail carrier & the 2nd woman to be a U. S. Mail carrier.

Meet 5 Pioneering Women

Mary Fields aka Stagecoach Mary. The first African American woman to be a mail carrier & the 2nd woman to be a U. S. Mail carrier.

Henrietta Lacks (August 1, 1920 – October 4, 1951)[1] (sometimes erroneously called Henrietta Lakes, Helen Lane or Helen Larson) was an African-American woman who was the unwitting source of cells (from her cancerous tumor) which were cultured by George Otto Gey to create the first known human immortal cell line for medical research. This is now known as the HeLa cell line.[2]

Henrietta Lacks (August 1, 1920 – October 4, 1951)[1] (sometimes erroneously called Henrietta Lakes, Helen Lane or Helen Larson) was an African-American woman who was the unwitting source of cells (from her cancerous tumor) which were cultured by George Otto Gey to create the first known human immortal cell line for medical research. This is now known as the HeLa cell line.[2]

Sacajawea. Stolen, held captive, sold, eventually reunited the Shoshone Indians. She was an interpreter and guide for Lewis and Clark in 1805-1806 with her husband Toussaint Charbonneau. She navigated carrying her son, Jean Baptiste, on her back. She traveled thousands of miles from the Dakotas the Pacific Ocean. The explorers, said she was cheerful, never complained, and proved to be invaluable. She served as an advisor, caretaker, and is legendary for her perseverance and resourcefulness.

Sacajawea. Stolen, held captive, sold, eventually reunited the Shoshone Indians. She was an interpreter and guide for Lewis and Clark in 1805-1806 with her husband Toussaint Charbonneau. She navigated carrying her son, Jean Baptiste, on her back. She traveled thousands of miles from the Dakotas the Pacific Ocean. The explorers, said she was cheerful, never complained, and proved to be invaluable. She served as an advisor, caretaker, and is legendary for her perseverance and resourcefulness.

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