Year: Between 1406 and 1430  Originally appeared in: Manuscript made in Constantinople  Now appears in: The Naming of Names by Anna Pavord  Feared for its deadly shriek when pulled from the ground, the mandrake was thought to take male or female form. According to an 11th-century Anglo-Saxon manuscript, the mandrake also shined at night like a lamp, and would flee from "an unclean man."

Mandrake roots The Morgan Dioscurides (Pierpont Morgan Library, MS M. is a Byzantine illuminated copy of the De Materia Medica by Dioscurides. The illustrations closely reflect those in the Vienna Dioscurides.

Medieval Bestiary : Mandrake Gallery BL., Sloane MS 1975, Folio 49r. A mandrake is tied to a dog, which will pull the palnt from the earth.

British Library, Sloane MS Folio A mandrake is tied to a dog, which will pull the plant from the earth.

British Library, Harley 3736, f.59r (Mandrake and Nigella). Giovanni Cadamosto, Herbal with treatises on food, poisons and remedies, and the properties of stones. Last quarter of the 15th century or 1st half of the 16th century.

British Library, Harley (Mandrake and Nigella). Giovanni Cadamosto, Herbal with treatises on food, poisons and remedies, and the properties of stones. Last quarter of the century or.

Mandrake and dog. England; Second half of the 12th century. Pen drawing of the mandragora plant (mandrake), supposed to have a human-shaped root and which can be uprooted by tying a dog to it.

Mandrake and dog. Second half of the century. Pen drawing of the mandragora plant (mandrake), supposed to have a human-shaped root and which can be uprooted by tying a dog to it.

Witch's Garden, Botanical Illustration, Art Journals, Botanical Prints, Occult, Witchcraft, Folklore, Medieval, Roots

Mandragora, 1636, Castore Durante, Herbario nvovo di Castore Dvrante, Italy, Venetia: Appresso I. Givnti, P. 281 -Detail

Mandragora, 1636, Castore Durante, Herbario nvovo di Castore Dvrante, Italy, Venetia: Appresso I. Givnti, P. 281 -Detail

Mandragora, Female, 1475-1525, Italian Herbal, TR F Herbal, Special Collections, University of Vermont Library, P.72

Mandragora, Female, 1475-1525, Italian Herbal, TR F Herbal, Special Collections, University of Vermont Library, P.72

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It wasn’t until the Middle Ages that Mandrake became popular as a magical plant, and was hailed as a miracle talisman, capable of curing just about anything. It was the root in particular that.

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