Jewish new year recipes | Claudia Roden | Life and style | The Observer

Jewish new year recipes | Claudia Roden | Life and style | The Observer

Roast this beef brisket tonight, whether you're Jewish or not

The Last-Minute Rosh Hashanah Brisket

Rum and Raisin Hamantaschen

The traditional flavors are apricot, fig, prunes, strawberry — that kind of thing.

I have never met a challah I did not like. There is simply something magical about the puffed, egg-enriched loaves that sit at the center of many Jewish holiday meals and that make an extravagant base for French toast. And yet as a kid, I would count down the days to Rosh Hashanah when my mom would bring home challah baked specially for the holiday.

Apple Butter Challah

I have never met a challah I did not like. There is simply something magical about the puffed, egg-enriched loaves that sit at the center of many Jewish holiday meals and that make an extravagant base for French toast. And yet as a kid, I would count down the days to Rosh Hashanah when my mom would bring home challah baked specially for the holiday.

PASSOVER! diregard the recpe for smores it has marshmallows but the rest are good.

25 Delicious Ways To Use Matzoh

PASSOVER! diregard the recpe for smores it has marshmallows but the rest are good.

Passover Desserts // Chocolate Passover Cookies Recipe

Chocolate Passover Cookies

~ Charcuterie recipe for how to make Pastrami from scratch..... <3 Romanian Jews brought the recipe for pastirma to New York in the mid-19th century, where it was commonly made from goose* that was dried, spice rubbed and cured, smoked, and finally steamed. The name and the meat—today pastrami is most often beef—were altered in America, while pastrami’s reputation as “Jewish food” spread across the country.

~ Charcuterie recipe for how to make Pastrami from scratch..... <3 Romanian Jews brought the recipe for pastirma to New York in the mid-19th century, where it was commonly made from goose* that was dried, spice rubbed and cured, smoked, and finally steamed. The name and the meat—today pastrami is most often beef—were altered in America, while pastrami’s reputation as “Jewish food” spread across the country.

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