Explore Japanese Mythology, Mythical Creatures and more!

Nekomata/Bakeneko (Japanese) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nekomata/////The bakeneko is similar to the nekomata but doesn't have two tails.

Nekomata/Bakeneko (Japanese) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nekomata/////The bakeneko is similar to the nekomata but doesn't have two tails.

The Priest Raigo of Mii Temple Transformed By Wicked Thoughts into a Rat.  Tsukioka Yoshitoshi.

The Priest Raigo of Mii Temple Transformed By Wicked Thoughts into a Rat. Tsukioka Yoshitoshi.

Shuten-dōji (酒呑童子)  There are three monsters who are considered the greatest and most evil yokai in all of Japanese folklore: the ghost of Emperor Sutoku, a nine-tailed kitsune named Tamamo-no-Mae, and the dreaded king of the oni, Shuten-dōji. (Sometimes just for fun, Nurarihyon is thrown in there to make it the four most powerful yokai in all of Japan.)  Shuten-dōji, who’s name could be translated as “little alcoholic,” was not born an oni. There are many legends about how he came to be…

Shuten-dōji (酒呑童子) There are three monsters who are considered the greatest and most evil yokai in all of Japanese folklore: the ghost of Emperor Sutoku, a nine-tailed kitsune named Tamamo-no-Mae, and the dreaded king of the oni, Shuten-dōji. (Sometimes just for fun, Nurarihyon is thrown in there to make it the four most powerful yokai in all of Japan.) Shuten-dōji, who’s name could be translated as “little alcoholic,” was not born an oni. There are many legends about how he came to be…

The Futakuchi-onna (Two-Mouthed Woman) : in Japanese mythology, there was a miser who lived by himself because he did not want to spent money on food for a wife. When he met a woman who did not eat anything, he married her, but soon his stores of rice began decreasing. One day he stayed behind from work to spy on his new wife. He saw her hair part on the back of her head to reveal a gaping mouth. She unbound her hair, which reached out like tentacles to shovel the rice into the hungry mouth.

The Futakuchi-onna (Two-Mouthed Woman) : in Japanese mythology, there was a miser who lived by himself because he did not want to spent money on food for a wife. When he met a woman who did not eat anything, he married her, but soon his stores of rice began decreasing. One day he stayed behind from work to spy on his new wife. He saw her hair part on the back of her head to reveal a gaping mouth. She unbound her hair, which reached out like tentacles to shovel the rice into the hungry mouth.

Ushi Oni- Japanese folklore: a giant spider or crab with a head of a bovine. It is said to ward off evil spirits.

Ushi Oni- Japanese folklore: a giant spider or crab with a head of a bovine. It is said to ward off evil spirits.

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