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JFK: Two unidentified women burst into tears outside Parkland Hospital on hearing that President John F. Kennedy died from the bullet fired by an assassin while riding in a motorcade in Dallas. (Nov. 22, 1963)

JFK: Two unidentified women burst into tears outside Parkland Hospital on hearing that President John F. Kennedy died from the bullet fired by an assassin while riding in a motorcade in Dallas. (Nov. 22, 1963)

Three Presidents, three giants--one election. A thousand secrets. [1960 pitted a warring trio of legendary, unique and totally different personalities--John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Richard M. Nixon, and Lyndon Baines Johnson--three imperfect, all-too-human, giants scrambling and scheming and clawing for the presidency of the United States.]

Three Presidents, three giants--one election. A thousand secrets. [1960 pitted a warring trio of legendary, unique and totally different personalities--John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Richard M. Nixon, and Lyndon Baines Johnson--three imperfect, all-too-human, giants scrambling and scheming and clawing for the presidency of the United States.]

Historians generally agree that Kennedy's phone call to Coretta Scott King expressing concern over her husband's arrest in Atlanta, October 1960 — and Robert Kennedy's work behind the scenes to get King released — helped JFK win the White House that fall. King himself, while appreciative, wasn't as quick to credit the Kennedys alone with getting him out of jail, according to a previously unreleased portion of the interview with the civil rights leader.

Historians generally agree that Kennedy's phone call to Coretta Scott King expressing concern over her husband's arrest in Atlanta, October 1960 — and Robert Kennedy's work behind the scenes to get King released — helped JFK win the White House that fall. King himself, while appreciative, wasn't as quick to credit the Kennedys alone with getting him out of jail, according to a previously unreleased portion of the interview with the civil rights leader.

COINTELPRO, a plot hatched by President Hoover to dismantle the BPP.

COINTELPRO, a plot hatched by President Hoover to dismantle the BPP.

1960: John F. Kennedy, left, and Richard Nixon after the first of their four presidential debates. While both candidates sympathized with the struggles of African-Americans, Kennedy's efforts resonated more with voters. Both Kennedy and Nixon openly sympathized with African-Americans, but neither pushed concrete solutions out on the campaign trail, fearful of alienating Southern whites. AP Photo.

1960: John F. Kennedy, left, and Richard Nixon after the first of their four presidential debates. While both candidates sympathized with the struggles of African-Americans, Kennedy's efforts resonated more with voters. Both Kennedy and Nixon openly sympathized with African-Americans, but neither pushed concrete solutions out on the campaign trail, fearful of alienating Southern whites. AP Photo.

The Reverend George Lee (1903-1955), a pioneer in the early Mississippi Civil Rights Movement, was a Vice President of the Regional Council of Negro Leadership, a co-founder of the Belzoni NAACP branch, and a powerful public speaker. In the spring of 1955 he addressed a crowd of 10,000 gathered at a Mound Bayou, Mississippi voter registration rally. Two weeks later, on May 7, he was assassinated; no one was ever charged for the murder.

The Reverend George Lee (1903-1955), a pioneer in the early Mississippi Civil Rights Movement, was a Vice President of the Regional Council of Negro Leadership, a co-founder of the Belzoni NAACP branch, and a powerful public speaker. In the spring of 1955 he addressed a crowd of 10,000 gathered at a Mound Bayou, Mississippi voter registration rally. Two weeks later, on May 7, he was assassinated; no one was ever charged for the murder.

On Aug. 20, 1958, James Brazier’s father was arrested and beat by a Dawson County police officer on a charge of driving under the influence. James Brazier was arrested at his home for interfering with an arrest. Brazier died five days later at a hospital in Columbus, GA, from brain damage and a fractured skull.

On Aug. 20, 1958, James Brazier’s father was arrested and beat by a Dawson County police officer on a charge of driving under the influence. James Brazier was arrested at his home for interfering with an arrest. Brazier died five days later at a hospital in Columbus, GA, from brain damage and a fractured skull.

September 9, 1957 Civil Rights Act of 1957  President Eisenhower signs the Civil Rights Act of 1957, which provided for the creation of a civil rights commission to investigate voting irregularities and a civil rights division in the Justice Department.

September 9, 1957 Civil Rights Act of 1957 President Eisenhower signs the Civil Rights Act of 1957, which provided for the creation of a civil rights commission to investigate voting irregularities and a civil rights division in the Justice Department.

JFK Library--In this campaign spot, actor, musician, and civil rights activist Harry Belafonte sits down with JFK to discuss equal opportunity. Belafonte, was active in the civil rights movement. He was mentored by Paul Robeson and was a friend and supporter of Martin Luther King Jr.

JFK Library--In this campaign spot, actor, musician, and civil rights activist Harry Belafonte sits down with JFK to discuss equal opportunity. Belafonte, was active in the civil rights movement. He was mentored by Paul Robeson and was a friend and supporter of Martin Luther King Jr.

Theodore Roosevelt Mason Howard, was a physician who created successful hospitals for indigent blacks and performed many abortions long before Roe v. Wade. In 1942, he became the chief surgeon at an all-black hospital in Mound Bayou, Mississippi. The hospital was founded and supported by a black fraternal order, the Taborians, to provide health care for poor Mississippians.

Theodore Roosevelt Mason Howard, was a physician who created successful hospitals for indigent blacks and performed many abortions long before Roe v. Wade. In 1942, he became the chief surgeon at an all-black hospital in Mound Bayou, Mississippi. The hospital was founded and supported by a black fraternal order, the Taborians, to provide health care for poor Mississippians.

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